The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2017

CODES + SYMBOLS

STEPHANIE YEE

URSULA JOHNSON

JORDAN BENNETT

Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann's oil and Instagram works are in dialogue with the rich tradition of European painting. Wellmann's pushing both mediums and proving the timeless potency of the unsettling image.
Amery Sandford: Master of ceremonies

Amery Sandford: Master of ceremonies

Amery Sandford draws upon the history of touristic paraphernalia, such as postcards and brochures from the early 20th Century that depicted North America as a pristine escape from the cultural and economic troubles of one’s homeland—a new frontier....
Looking back: Our version of "women in the arts" in the 70's

Looking back: Our version of “women in the arts” in the 70’s

The 70's art world "was a desert for women! Let alone any person of colour!” But in 1977, in the second issue of Visual Arts News, we published a list of publications focusing on "women in the arts."...
Exhibition Listings
Industrious

Industrious

Gallery 3
Artist presentation: Wed 29 March, 12 Noon

Industrious is a multimedia installation prompted by detritus collected from sites of industrial ruin on Cape Breton Island. Arsenault presents collected, restored, replicated and archived industrial artefacts alongside maps, narratives, and other research materials related to place in order to question the ways in which the stories we choose to tell, and call history, are relayed.

Take Hold

Take Hold

Gallery 1
Artist Talk: Tues 4 April, 12 Noon 

This exhibition of contemporary art jewellery is Wareham’s personal response to the strong emotional transition of becoming a mother. The work speaks to the “loss of control, assault to her self-esteem and identity, and the struggle with the ambivalence” she feels toward her new role as a mother. Using traditional and non-traditional metalsmithing techniques, Wareham utilizes the bracelet form to affirm a strong conceptual tie to the emotions and actions felt and performed through this new developing relationship.

In Some Far Place

In Some Far Place

In 1977, a flamingo landed on the coast of Newfoundland and was immediately shot. Now preserved in the collection of The Rooms, the strange story of how this tropical bird came to be in its final resting place far from home is the starting point for this contemporary art exhibition that explores the inherent absurdity and poignancy of collecting behaviour. What motivates us to collect? How do we choose what to include and exclude from our collections and exhibitions? Artworks by local, national, and international artists are bought together with a selection of works from The Rooms Permanent Collections that have never before been exhibited. Throughout, works that incorporate song and voice elude to absence and elegy, but also to the limitless power of sound to exclaim presence, even when there is no “room” for physical inclusion. The end result is a sumptuous, poetic experience for the eyes, and ears.

David R. Harper, Learning to Love You (detail), Wood, steel, cast polymer with virgin paper pulp, photo paper, enamel, paint.2015. photo credit: Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Sara Cwynar, Soft Film, 16mm film transferred to digital video, 2016

 

savi|skoop

savi|skoop

Gallery 2
Artist talk: Wed 5 April, 12 Noon

Heinsalu presents a range of optical conditions in which clay and light are merged. This exhibition proposes a shift in perception of materiality and its becomings through curiosity and de-familiarization of known experience.

Cold Nights

Cold Nights

in the rOGUE: Cold Nights is a collection of illustrative portraits of varying media. The work is embedded with imagery representative of my hometown in Labrador and the east coast of Newfoundland—through botany, wild animals and landscapes. The portraits are illustrative in style and express my interest in storytelling, design and painting. Each piece of Cold Nights is its own experiment in color, narrative and illustrative style. Collected over a few years, the creation of Cold Nights was a slow and therapeutic process. Over that time, I navigated through the waters of being a post-BFA artist to becoming a full-time student again while also trying to continue my artistic practice. The resulting work is a collection of smaller travel-friendly pieces, in media ranging from sketchbook pages to digital paintings.

Sam Moss is an ex-Haligonian born in Labrador City, and currently living in St. John’s. She graduated with a BFA from NSCAD University in 2014, and is currently studying Computer Engineering at Memorial University. When not debugging code, she likes to draw/make/destroy things.

Why Can’t Minimal: an exhibition of humorous minimalism

Why Can’t Minimal: an exhibition of humorous minimalism

Exhibition organized and circulated by the Art Museum at the University of Toronto and made possible in part by a grant from the Ontario Arts Council’s National and International Touring Program, and the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

Why Can’t Minimal mines minimalism for its humorous side by pointing to a latent absurdity hiding beneath its cool demeanour. The exhibition rejects the assumption that minimal art requires solely serious, solemn contemplation, and embraces the more intuitive, jovial, and personal pleasures that occur when one has fun with the comically utopian ambitions of unitary forms. Playing with the forms, traditions and incongruities of multiple levels of minimalism, the presented works elude rational comprehension, repositioning conceptual value to make room for the types of recognition made possible through levity, play, humour and sentiment.

John Boyle-Singfield, Untitled (Coke Zero), Plexiglas, Coke Zero, white steel base,2012

John Marriott,  Hidden in Plain Sight, Digital collage on paper, 2013

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters

The Walking With Our Sisters – K’jipuktuk / Halifax planning committee would like the community to join us for the Pjila’si / Welcoming for Walking With Our Sisters on January 14 at 2pm, located in Mount Saint Vincent University’s McCain Centre Atrium (166 Bedford Highway). This will be followed by a feast and everyone is welcome to visit the Walking With Our Sisters commemoration in the MSVU Art Gallery afterwards.  There will be volunteers on site to help direct visitors to these locations.  All are welcome.

Walking With Our Sisters is a commemoration honouring missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and Two-Spirit people through ceremony, community and reflection.  It presents more than 1800 pairs of moccasin tops (vamps) made by contributing artists. The moccasins are unfinished, symbolizing over 1180 sisters, mothers, aunties, daughters, cousins, grandmothers, wives and partners whose lives were tragically cut short over the last thirty years.  This project has been entirely crowd-sourced and supported by thousands of Indigenous and non-Indigenous women and men across Turtle Island who care deeply about this issue. All of our efforts in bringing this exhibit to life have been on a strictly voluntary basis.

Walking With Our Sisters is rooted in the four principles of love, humility, protocol and volunteerism, and is guided by local Elders and community members. As Walking With Our Sisters is experienced in ceremony, footwear is to be removed before entering the space. Women are encouraged to wear skirts if they feel comfortable doing so.  Smudging (the burning of sage) will take place inside the MSVU Art Gallery, cleansing the space for the Sisters.  There will be no photography permitted at any time.  Public figures and dignitaries are welcome to attend but there will be no public speakers.

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Borrowing heavily from the language of wine, this 3-part exhibition strategy proposes to look at regional artistic production through the cultural milieu from which it emerges.  Terroir is defined as “the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.” Terroir is a survey of the AGNS permanent collection with a special focus on Nova Scotia roots — the history and culture of place informing its artistic community’s output. This exhibition tours the province exploring the flavour and makeup of the work collected over the AGNS’ history.

Image credit: Jones Bannerman, Frances M, Still Life with Lobster (detail), c.1883, Oil on canvas, 51.5 x 65.0 cm. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 1933.4

 

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Opening Reception: Friday October 7, 2016 4:00-6:00PM

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away is an exhibition that commemorates 2016 as the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Canada. Women first earned the right to vote in Canada in 1916 but it was not until 1960 that all Canadian women, regardless of ethnicity or Indigenous status were eligible to fully participate in the political process.

Featuring artwork by over 15 women artists from the Cape Breton University Art Gallery’s collection and three new works by contemporary Canadian artists, Kinuk (Dartmouth, NS) comprised of Ursula Johnson and Angella Parsons, Diane Borsato (Toronto, ON) and Anne Morrell Robinson (Margaree Valley, NS) in collaboration with the Ocean Waves Quilt Society (Cape Breton Island, NS), and D’Arcy Wilson (Halifax, NS) who completed an artist residency at CBU Art Gallery in July 2016.

The artists presented in this exhibition have unique connections to Cape Breton, whether they were born and raised, lived and worked, or visitors to the region with lasting impressions, these women have shaped and been shaped by the island, its people and the dynamic landscape.

Image: Lindee Climo, Lady of Gustavia, 1978.

Ceramics

Ceramics

 

Maja Padrov’s recent work is about exploring sculptural possibilities of teapots and other spouted pouring vessels. Their function is sometimes emphasized and sometimes concealed, aiming for intuitive connections of the elements and overall visual balance of the finished piece. The inspiration for these pieces came from different everyday objects. Padrov is interested in the metaphor for containment and also the possibility of function that ‘might follow the form’.

Maja Padrov, Untitled Vessel, ceramic, 2016

 

 

Exuvia

Exuvia

Exuvia is an exhibition of funerary jars, sometimes referred to as reliquaries or urns. At the end of its time developing undergound, the cicada digs to the surface to move from one life stage to the next.  In this process of change the cicada leaves behind a shell, called the exuvia, and it flies away. At some level the finished jar is a likeness of who it is that will transition, important not for what it holds but for what has stepped out and flown away leaving an essential hint of what lives on.

Rachel Morouney, crenellated fan pattern, carved and glazed ceramic, 2014. photo credit: images courtesy of the artist

ReWork,

ReWork,

Reception & informal discussion: Tues 7 March, 5:30 – 7:30PM 

In Winter 2016, students in Barbara Lounder’s Foundation Constructed Forms class worked with used furniture provided by the Habitat for Humanity Nova Scotia ReStore. Over a period of several weeks, the students reinvented these objects as artworks. Their goal was to explore the practical and conceptual potential for reworking existing forms, and to help raise awareness about the need for good, affordable housing in our communities. Pieces by Alex Bar, Gina Brigante, Harry Cotaras, Chloe Elgie, Mackenzie Graves, Chelsea Innes, Kaya Karpinska, Jay Merriott and Kat Savoie are featured in ReWork.

More Exhibition Listings »

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