The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2017

CODES + SYMBOLS

STEPHANIE YEE

URSULA JOHNSON

JORDAN BENNETT

The NSCAD Venice Connection

The NSCAD Venice Connection

Representation of NSCAD across multiple shows and national delegations underline the school’s place in the broader art world, as well as Atlantic Canada’s slow move away from the international art world’s periphery.
Ursula Johnson: Weaving history

Ursula Johnson: Weaving history

Johnson is concerned that Mi’kmaq baskets will become obsolete, referenced only in archives or glanced at as artifacts on the dusty shelves of art collectors.
Unearthing buried histories of African Nova Scotian artists

Unearthing buried histories of African Nova Scotian artists

"Chris! I have been secretly waiting for this email for decades! Talk to me."
Landon Mackenzie’s hidden creative journey

Landon Mackenzie’s hidden creative journey

“People thought I was a guy. I kept secret that I had three kids. I kept secret that I was a woman.”
Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann's oil and Instagram works are in dialogue with the rich tradition of European painting. Wellmann's pushing both mediums and proving the timeless potency of the unsettling image.
Exhibition Listings
Other Histories

Other Histories

Other Histories is a solo exhibition by Pakistani-Canadian artist, Amin Rehman, in collaboration with international activist, writer and commentator, Tariq Ali. The exhibition comments on neo-colonialism and assertive globalisation through wall-based text works employing texts by Tariq Ali, Noam Chomsky and Edward Said. Rehman uses Perso-Arabic scripts (Kufi and Talib) to encompass his diasporic identity within a contemporary art practice.

Amin Rehman, For Globalization, Encaustic installation, 2015. photo credit: Amin Rehman

 

Open Studio artist-in-residence

Open Studio artist-in-residence

Beth Frey is a Montreal-based artist working in drawing, sculpture, installation and performance. Using humour and pathos, Frey examines the boundaries and ruptures of the body as sites of growth and creativity vis-a-vis the boundaries and ruptures intrinsic to the art objects she creates.

 

SPECTRA

SPECTRA

Friday, May 12, 2017 at 6:00pm. The artist will be present.

ADAC Gallery Hop in Conversation with the Artist: Saturday, May 13th, at 1pm

Artist Statement: Three separate but connected groups of paintings in this exhibition pay homage to the power of colour. In seven watercolours, I return to the traditional still-life genre, where each painting focuses on a spectrum colour. The rich colour of ripe fruit is enlivened by decorative motifs of dishes, glassware and tablecloths. Revisiting the captured light and colour of Impressionism, and reassessing the formal qualities of abstraction, I have integrated sculptural elements in large acrylic paintings to create shadows and tension on the painting’s surface.
Bridging representation in the watercolour paintings and the complexity of the abstract painting, are seven small relief structures, each one charged with a spectrum colour, varying in tone, intensity and hue. Playing with the energy of individual colour, light and shadow are introduced, highlighting the symbolic and emotional qualities of the spectrum. The experiences of a life lived are the source of my art while light and colour have been my inspiration. Events and emotions are recalled, ideas are revisited, reassessed, and transfigured into paint and the magic of spectra.

Nancy is an established painter in the prime of her career, with a wide range of significant exhibitions in both institutional and commercial galleries. She was born in Vancouver and received a well-rounded art education at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts under Arthur Lismer, at Mount Allison University under Alex Colville and at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome. Nancy works in variety of media, including acrylic, watercolour and collage. All these are represented in the current exhibition.

Open Studio artist-in-residence

Open Studio artist-in-residence

Born in Ontario, Canada, D’Andrea grew up in the small town of Sharon. In this semi-rural community the legacy of the 1970s – long hair, big cars, loud stereo systems and hard rock on vinyl – still had influence. Sound had weight and dimension; D’Andrea has strong memories of lying on the floor listening to Deep Purple records, feeling the bass in his body and imagining different worlds. As a first generation Canadian, D’Andrea grew up with a father who found for himself what it meant to be Canadian in a big backyard, a canoe, camping trips, rock bands and beer. Since relocating to Hamilton, D’Andrea finds a version of this hard-rocking, working-class Canadiana is a prominent part of the city’s cultural identity which has influenced his work along with the city’s history of manufacturing and its strong DIY and salvaging culture.

Marco D’Andrea, DREAMCAR (Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight), installation,2014

 

CERA ALBA: L’alliage de l’éphémère à l’éternel

CERA ALBA: L’alliage de l’éphémère à l’éternel

CERA ALBA examines Acadian artist Romeo Savoie’s use of found objects and everyday naturally occurring materials, and how these might be reconfigured in his works to create new and unexpected meaning. The resulting body of work instigates innovative ways of relating organic and inorganic elements unto what can best be described as an “all-over” painterly surface.

Curated by Paul Édouard Bourque, this exhibition focuses on a pared-down selection of works produced during a time when Savoie was seriously questioning the role of the found object in a work of art, and how this issue relates to the overall scheme of his oeuvre. Modular elements figure prominently in the building-up of the pieces, with various references to grid-work and multiples; these are combined with superimposed diptychs and sectional pieces designed to dominate larger areas once installed.

Savoie’s exuberant uses of beeswax, twigs, branches, glass and faded flower petals are brazenly combined with his trademark painterly application of saturated pigments onto a textured, heavily worked-up surface of either canvas or wood panel. These works address the artist’s perennial questioning of the value judgements inherent in the representation of reality, and how mere worldly materiality might somehow lay claim to notions of the eternal.

Recent work by Romeo Savoie. Photographed at his studio in Barachois, 23 September 2014.

Roméo Savoie, Glass, Mixed media on wood, 2013. photo credit: Mathieu Léger

 

Bunty’s Umbrellas

Bunty’s Umbrellas

POP UP Exhibit

May 16 – 23 Rocket Room, St. John’s, NL

June 3 – July 28  Lester Garland House, Trinity, NL

Embellished umbrellas in this group exhibit proclaim one’s passion for embroidery and remember Bunty Severs.  Bunty was well known and loved across Canada as a hand embroidery creator and teacher with a focus on technical skill and excellence in needlework. Organized by the Craft Council Gallery in conjunction with embroiderer Susan Furneaux.

 

RE:collection

RE:collection

 RE:collection explores the building of a Canadian art collection in Charlottetown as both an optimistic mission and a reflection on the evolving country, its history, geography, people and communities. The diverse visions, observations, and ideas of artists represented within the collection allow us to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation with one of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s largest collections-based exhibitions and publication.

Robert Harris (1849-1919), The Studio Boy’s Private View, 1886, oil on canvas, 89.5 x 74.5 cm. Gift of an anonymous donor, 1978, CAG H-571

Kathleen Daly (1898-1994), Untitled (Young Man & Landscape), undated, oil on canvas, 96.5 x 83.8 cm.Gift of the Estate of Kathleen Daly, Toronto, Ont., 1994, CAG 94.5.60

Garry Neill Kennedy (1935-), Q (from Quid Pro Quo), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 274.3 x 213.4 cm. Gift of the artist, 2016, CAG 2016.3

The Space Between

The Space Between

Opening Recital and Reception: Friday 24 March 2017 at 7:30 pm, Brunton Auditorium

The Owens Art Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of the exhibition and musical premiere of The Space Between, a creative collaboration between composer Kevin Morse and visual artist Dan Steeves.

The Space Between is an interdisciplinary project that includes a series of intaglio prints, a composition for string quartet, and a spatialized audio installation. Morse’s new composition for string quartet will be premiered by the Tesla Quartet on Friday, March 24, followed by the opening of the exhibition and a reception at the Owens Art Gallery. This event is free and will begin at 7:30 pm at Brunton Auditorium.

Dan Steeves is a visual artist who works primarily as an Intaglio printmaker. Steeves is the Printmaking Technician and a Lecturer in the Mount Allison University Department of Fine Arts. He has been the recipient of a number of significant awards, including the New Brunswick Strathbutler Award for Excellence in the Arts and the 2014 Open Studio National Printmaking Award. Steeves holds a BFA from Mount Allison University.

Kevin Morse teaches in the Department of Music at Mount Allison University, where he held a Marjorie Young Bell Faculty Fellowship from 2013 to 2015. His recent compositions include a chamber opera, music for piano and voice, and an orchestral work premiered by the Prince Edward Island Symphony Orchestra. He holds a PhD from the University of Western Ontario.

The Tesla Quartet is the Bell String Quartet-in-Residence at Mount Allison University for the 2016-2017 Music Anniversary year. Formed at The Juilliard School in 2008, the quartet recently took Second Prize as well as the Haydn Prize and Canadian Commission Prize at the 12th Banff International String Quartet Competition.

The exhibition will remain at the Owens until May 21 and will move to the Saint John Arts Centre in October. A guidebook including Steeves’ images, excerpts of Morse’s score, and essays by Anne Koval and Gary Tucker will be available at the Owens Art Gallery in May 2017.

Truth or Myth?

Truth or Myth?

The next installation of Truth or Myth? draws on the permanent collection to explore the changing relationship between cultural identity and food in Newfoundland and Labrador, as portrayed by artists such as Grant Boland, Martin Lyons, Derrick Pottle, Mary Pratt, and Helen Parsons Shepherd.

Grant Boland, High Class Candies, oil on canvas, 2002. Photo credit: The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Collection

In Our Time: The Political Cartoons of Josh Silburt (1942-1947)

In Our Time: The Political Cartoons of Josh Silburt (1942-1947)

Opening Reception: Friday, June 9th, 2017 | 6:00-8:00pm

Throughout the 1930s and 1940s Josh Silburt published over a thousand political and sports cartoons in major newspapers across Canada. Silburt was also the editorial cartoonist at the Sydney Post Record (now the Cape Breton Post) in the mid-1940s. The exhibition will highlight some of the issues that continue to shape Cape Breton culture.

There will be a formal lecture provided by Josh Silburt’s son Allan Silburt on the life and career of the artist on June 9th at 12:00pm in the CBU Art Gallery. More details will be coming soon so stay tuned by checking our social media feeds (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram: links at the bottom of this email) and additional information will be posted on: http://www.cbu.ca/campus/art-gallery/.

Parallel Play

Parallel Play

Opening June 18, 1 – 3 pm

Amanda Rhodenizer’s painting practice engages with the narrative potential of homes and land in transition. These properties may be abandoned, vacant, under construction, or listed for sale or rent. Taking cues from Canadian real-estate and rental practices, she explores the tensions in our relationships with place – colonially, commercially, and emotionally.

Inspired by the advent of the “sharing economy” and the quest for a more authentic “stay experience” (i.e. trying to live like a local), the paintings in Parallel Play consider a balance between access and ownership. Based on a photo-shoot staged by the artist in a modern beachfront rental property, Rhodenizer also made visits to document land for sale on Nova Scotia’s South Shore.

In the field of childhood development, the phrase “parallel play” describes toddlers’ tendency to play side by side without trying to influence one another’s behaviour. Likewise, Rhodenizer’s paintings give space to the adjacent experiences of guests and hosts, viewer and viewed. Among the wall-to-wall windows and sliding doors, tenants and proprietors frame the view of the landscape outside, while small, discrete studies of “vacant” land consistently punctuate the space in-between.

Born in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, Amanda Rhodenizer received her BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in 2006. Since receiving her MFA from the University of Waterloo in 2014 she has continued to live and work in Waterloo, Ontario. She was the Nova Scotia winner of the BMO 1st! Art Award (2006) and is the recent recipient of the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation Grant and the Region of Waterloo Arts Fund (both 2016). Recently, her work has been presented in solo exhibitions at Rotunda Gallery, and Open Sesame (both in Kitchener), and in group exhibitions at Art Mûr (Montréal), the Orillia Museum of Art & History (Orillia), and in the survey exhibition “Terroir” at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (Halifax).  www.arhodenizer.com

The DE-CELEBRATION of CANADA 150

The DE-CELEBRATION of CANADA 150

Opening: 6PM Monday June 19th 2017
Artist talk: 12PM Tuesday July 11th 2017

K’jipuktuk – The Khyber Centre for the Arts is pleased to present The DE-CELEBRATION of CANADA 150 by local artist Raven Davis. Opening on June 19th 2017, the de-celebration of Canada 150 will be marked with a provoking contemporary exhibition that critically explores Canadian propaganda and how the celebration of Canada 150 perpetuates the erasure of Indigenous people in Halifax and in the rest of Canada.

The DE-CELEBRATION of CANADA 150 is a multi-disciplinary exhibition that aims to bring attention to Indigenous issues both historical and current and create engagement with gallery visitors through installation, photography and media. Pieces such as “Whiteness is Civility” and “Canada-Playing with Our Lives” an installation piece speaking to the negligence and lack of efforts made by the Canadian Government to protect Indigenous women, Two-Spirit and children’s lives, will be on exhibit bookending July 1st.

More Exhibition Listings »

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