The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2017

REBUILD

EMILY PITTMAN

BRENDAN FERNANDES

RAVEN DAVIS

Beyond a seat at the table

Beyond a seat at the table

Black contemporary artists constantly have to explain themselves to be accepted into the dominant framework. Their work is often defined as activism, without their consent, merely because it is presented from their own worldview.
Brendan Fernandes' hybrid ghosts

Brendan Fernandes’ hybrid ghosts

"For me growing up in East Africa and living in the Western world, when I first came, there was always this idea that I was exotic."
Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane's controversial legacy

Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane’s controversial legacy

Visual Arts News' research intern explores the legacy of two NFB films from the '70s—One film portrayed Indigenous people in visual art, while the other depicted Indigenous people as visual art.
Steele + Tomczak collect strangers' confessions

Steele + Tomczak collect strangers’ confessions

The works in The Long Time transmit the sense that you’re missing or meeting something, getting just a trace of what came before and what is coming next.
Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Artists Kyle Alden Martens and Emily Lawrence both create playful work that subtly destabilizes traditionally heteronormative arenas—sports for Martens and mainstream porn and Martha Stewart cooking demonstrations for Lawrence.
The myth of home

The myth of home

Jerry Ropson’s to kiss a goat between the horns is a memorial to a cultural vernacular and way of life that has already left us—his grandfather's rural Newfoundland culture.
Exhibition Listings
Negotiations

Negotiations

The Hydrostone neighbourhood, now nearly one hundred years old, is one of the most striking legacies of the Halifax Explosion. It stands as a powerful testament to the reconstruction efforts required to house the working-class families who were left homeless by the events of the Explosion. For many, however, the Hydrostone’s appeal lies in its unique ability to express the passage of time: in this neighbourhood, layers of the present co-exist with traces of the past. The original grey granite ‘hydrostone’ blocks live anachronistically side-by-side with a dizzying array of wood, composite, and vinyl siding materials. Extensions have been added, shutters have been removed, exterior walls have been painted, porches have been closed in, and trees, shrubs, and gardens have been cultivated.

Halifax artist Claire Hodge has systematically photographed all of the existing homes to create a portrait of the changing face of a landmark neighbourhood. Hodge notes, “The Hydrostone townhomes reveal a complex set of negotiations realized tacitly or explicitly by the people who have lived there. Some blocks of houses are united in their aesthetic vision. Others seem to attest to greater individualist streaks and look strangely disjointed. Most often, the blocks of houses suggest a series of compromises between harmony and difference, between the ‘greater good’ and tenacious individualism.”

Truth or Myth?

Truth or Myth?

The next installation of Truth or Myth? draws on the permanent collection to explore the changing relationship between cultural identity and food in Newfoundland and Labrador, as portrayed by artists such as Grant Boland, Martin Lyons, Derrick Pottle, Mary Pratt, and Helen Parsons Shepherd.

Grant Boland, High Class Candies, oil on canvas, 2002. Photo credit: The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Collection

We Met Online: Finding Each Other

We Met Online: Finding Each Other

Stephanie Wu is a first generation Chinese-Canadian artist and educator based in Tkaronto. Through use of sculptures, projections and installations, they examine the intersections between queer identity, race, religion, mental health, suburbia and the online world.
www.stephanie-­‐wu.com

We Met Online: Finding Each Other is a video and sculpture based exhibition that explores the lack of intersectional queer and trans spaces in a predominately Westernized queer culture. Queerness and mental health are often portrayed with the exclusion of people of colour and the queer/trans community. This has led many queer/trans people of colour to go online in search of visibility, community, support and a sense of belonging.

This work will be delved into throughout a month long residency and series of public engagement opportunities as part of the 2017 KREAM program. See below for full event schedule and venue access notes.

Lunch Break: Open Studio Visit with Stephanie Wu – 12-2PM Tuesday, September 19th 2017

Bring your lunch over to the Khyber Centre for the Arts and join artist-in-residence Stephanie Wu for an open studio visit. They will be making pieces for We Met Online: Finding Each Other and discussing their process. This is an informal drop-in event, is open to the public and no registration is required.

Under the Moon: Reception of We Met Online: Finding Each Other, Potluck and Colouring Party6-9PM Friday, September 22nd 2017

In various Chinese myths, the moon symbolizes human emotions, gentleness and reunion. Come gather under the moon with other QTPOCs for the opening of We Met Online: Finding Each Other and an evening of food sharing and colouring. Stephanie Wu will create hand-drawn colouring books at the KREAM residency for visitors to keep and large colouring sheets for group colouring. Bring a dish and email info@khyber.ca with your dietary restrictions along with your favourite karaoke song! This is a substance-free, all-ages event open to QTPOCs and allies.

Artist Talk with Stephanie Wu – 6-730PM Thursday September 28th 2017

Stephanie Wu will discuss their art practice and their experience making We Met Online: Finding Each Other. They will also facilitate an activity on self-care, mental health and creating safer spaces for QTPOCs. This event requires registration, with a maximum of 10 participants who are QTPOC and allies. To register email info@khyber.ca.

New Paintings & "Slow Century"

New Paintings & “Slow Century”

Kim and Andy are both exploring the idea of nostalgia and shared memories, through popular objects in popular culture or recent history.

Andy MacDonald, Slow Century, Acrylic on Board, 2017

Kim Floyd, Parking Ramp, Kim Floyd , Acrylic on Board, 2017

 

 

 

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

The Gallery is very pleased to announce two significant contributions to the permanent collection that were received in 2016. Because we have very limited resources for the purchase of artworks, the Gallery relies on donations, of both acquisitions funds and artworks, to expand the collection, an activity that greatly enhances our ability to foster an appreciation and understanding of the visual arts within the Dalhousie University community, and to be a resource for our local and regional communities.

DANA CLAXTON: THE MUSTANG SUITE

This iconic series of five large-scale photographs by Dana Claxton, a Vancouver-based artist of Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux ancestry, spans considerations of popular western culture and assimilation, and Indigenous identity and representation. The suite presents staged portraits of members of a contemporary Indigenous family posing with various refigured mustangs: a muscle car, a banana-seat bicycle, a pony, and a white woman with horse blinders and mouth bit. Exhibited at the Dalhousie Art Gallery in 2011 as part of the National Gallery of Canada’s touring exhibition “Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists”, The Mustang Suite is distinguished for its incisive and provocative humour, impeccable technical production, and its many layers of social commentary and critique.

The acquisition was made possible through the generosity of the artist, financial contributions from Alumni members of Dalhousie University’s Schulich School of Law, and support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisitions Grants program. Assistance with the transportation from Vancouver of the framed photographs was provided by TOTAL Museum and Fine Arts Services, Toronto

We Shall See

We Shall See

 

Ian Willms father died after months of hospitalization and medical interventions due to a motorcycle accident. In We Shall See Willms documents his father’s traumatic injuries and the details of daily hospital visits. Despite their fraught familial relationship, Willms’ father encouraged him to photograph their “journey through unknown emotional terrain, in collaboration.” Unframed and printed on fragile tracing paper, the photographs depict the complexities of love, grief and mortality.

Ian Willms’ is an award-winning photojournalist based in Toronto and founding member of Boreal Collective.  We Shall See is presented in conjunction with Photopolis: The Halifax Festival of Photography.

Image: Ian Willms, Sister and I at the hospital, Inkjet print, 2014.

 

Holding Patterns

Holding Patterns

Main gallery

Textile artist Rachel Ryan investigates the various meanings suggested by her title, whether it is pattern in the textile sense or breaking free of the “holding pattern” of military wife and daughter.  In this mini-retrospective, the artist takes us through six years of her nature-based imagery with a mosaic quality.  Mainly autobiographical in theme, she explores the role of being a female artist and mother in our contemporary world.  Ryan’s most recent works evoke the evolving awareness of women.

Ryan Rachel – Fire And Water –Fabric Collage -2012

Greer View Mirror

Greer View Mirror

A selection of witty sculptural works from 1972 to 1990 by the Nova Scotia-based artist John Greer, all shown at the Isaacs Gallery in Toronto. Curated by Pan Wendt

John Greer, Take Some Respondability, 1974, epoxy clay, steel spoons, paper, 29 x 21 x 23 cm Courtesy of the artist.

This is Judy

This is Judy

Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador annex Gallery

A series of exuberant hooked rugs by Nova Scotia based artist Laura Kenney, which tell the story of irrepressible Judy, an eccentric but delightful character that lives in a hooked rug universe that the artist describes as “animated abstraction”.

 

 

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

THE PORTER COLLECTION
With a specific mandate to collect artworks by local and regional artists, and an emphasis on collecting works on paper, the Dalhousie Art Gallery permanent collection includes a number of mid and later twentieth century paintings and drawings of maritime subject matter. Because many of these have been acquired through donation, not only do they reflect the Gallery’s collecting interests, they also represent and reflect the various collecting interests of the donors.

The most recent donation to the Gallery is a selection of thirteen works from the private collection of Brian and Megan Porter and Family. Through their shared passion for art and a love for Atlantic Canada, the Porters have built a collection of early twentieth century paintings of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia maritime scenes, and works by several contemporary Atlantic Canadian artists.

Their donation makes a significant contribution to strengthening our collection, both by introducing the work of Molly Lamb and Mary Pratt—artists who were not as yet represented in the collection—and in complementing works by artists who are touchstones in the collection and in the Gallery’s collecting history, including AY Jackson, Robert Pilot, and Christopher Pratt.

Patti & Lawrence

Patti & Lawrence

Patti & Lawrence is a video projection by Paul Wong that uses found images and personal film footage to construct narratives on growing up Queer and Asian. It is presented in partnership with the Prismatic Arts Festival, Canada’s only multi-arts festival featuring culturally diverse and Aboriginal artists.

Paul Wong, Patti 21&25, Video, 2016

 

 

Oh! Canada

Oh! Canada

OPENING RECEPTION: September 21, 2017 at 6pm

This year marks the sesquicentennial of Canadian Confederation. On 1 July 1867 the existing United Province of Canada was divided to become the new provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and two other colonies, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, also became provinces of the new Dominion of Canada.

To mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Nova Scotia Designer Crafts Council, now known as Craft Nova Scotia, challenged our members to create works exploring their Canadian identity and/or celebrating Canadiana.

The works selected by our invited jurors, Patricia McClelland, Pamela Ritchie, and Phil Secord, range from varying representations of national symbols such as the maple leaf and Canada goose, to personal stories from the immigrant’s perspective, to thoughtful explorations of Canada’s history and current affairs. Together, the works in Oh! Canada present a multi-faceted, multi-layered view of being Canadian in 2017. -Susan Hanrahan, Executive Director, Craft Nova Scotia
Artists: Marla Benton, Berkeley Brown, Wilma Butts, Frances Dorsey, Linda Finley, Al Hattie, Violeta Izquierdo, Laura Kenney, Wendy Landry, Heather Lawson, Paula MacDonald, Dawn MacNutt, Alexandra McCurdy, Margot Metcalfe, Carol Morrow, Randy Mugford, Wendy Murray, Christina Parker, Nancy Price, Jim Smith, Vaughan L. Smith, Kas Stone, Isako Suzuki, Andrea Tsang Jackson, and Stephen Zwerling.

More Exhibition Listings »

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