Ursula Johnson’s ITHA: The Livingroom

Ursula Johnson has created a safe and hospitable space to delve deeply into conversational exchanges that reveal our complex relationships with places we call home, consumption, ownership, and one another—specifically what it means to be, as we all are, treaty people. Johnson’s exhibition, ITHA: The Livingroom, was on view at the Blue Building in K’jipuktuk/Halifax...

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Archival Futurism

The Significance of Rita Malik’s On Being Brown

As if being anything other than White in Halifax doesn’t already make you hyper-visible, the women in Rita Malik’s short film On Being Brown sometimes navigate quintessential Maritime markers wearing gold-embroidered jewel-toned lehengas. Even though it’s an ornate shirt-over-skirt set that South Asian women reserve for celebrations, the women in the film wear lehengas on...

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BONAVISTA BIENNALE 2021

Driving my car down the winding Bonavista highway, I remember how many times I’ve done this route – to watch whales, to go for a good slice of pizza, and, since 2017, to see contemporary art. Growing up in Clarenville, a town an hour and a half away from the Bonavista peninsula, I thought I...

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Carley Mullally Transforms Marine Debris

Stemming from generations of near-forgotten knowledge, Carley Mullally’s work transfigures discarded marine detritus into thoughtful contemporary artworks by employing traditional maritime rope making and net repair methods. Originating from New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Mullally discovered sewing at a very young age. This led her to diligently pursue fashion and garment making during her adolescent years....

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Call for Submissions: Connection

Upcoming: an issue that looks at connection through the lens of art and artistic practices in Mi’kma’ki. How do we connect through the arts? What is the process by which artists create relationship, and foster interrelatedness and possible links. Connection may be a form of kinship, a sharing of origins, or the characteristics of family...

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Life in Silos

Art, Work, and Motherhood

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, parents around the world—in particular mothers—have faced the conundrum of working from home while simultaneously providing comfort, care, and distraction for their children. The illusion that work is work and home is home, bred from decades of capitalism, seemed to dissipate. For many, the lockdowns over the past...

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Silver Linings

Karen Stentaford on Process and Placehood

Karen Stentaford has a long-standing preoccupation with place, geography, and belonging. Often the nature of Stentaford’s work requires her to spend long periods of time alone, enveloped by the landscape she is photographing. In some images—particularly in her Island series—the solitude is visceral. However, this quietude is not to be coerced into an extension of...

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Brandon Hoax’s Desire for Solitude

Trickster child Brandon Hoax, son of a Stonecoat mother and Dullahan father, summarizes their work using the following visual descriptors: being alone at a party, standing in a parking garage listening to the hum of a fluorescent bulb, and staying up late waiting for you to message me. Undoubtedly, aloneness is intricately woven into Hoax’s...

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Call for Submissions: Resilience

Upcoming: an issue that looks at resilience—the capacity to adapt and recover from difficulties —through the lens of art and artistic practices in Mi’kma’ki. How do we, as a community of artists, cultivate tenacity, flexibility or elasticity. We might consider resilience as a process of springing back from tragedy, or recovering from trauma, or as...

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Food, Sustenance & Queerness

Francesca Ekwuyasi’s Butter Honey Pig Bread stunningly explores the complex relationship between mothers and daughters, as it reconciles queerness with faith and offers the ingredients of spirituality, family ties, and intergenerational trauma to create a debut novel like no other. Born in Nigeria, Ekwuyasi moved to Halifax for graduate school, but writing has always been...

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