The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2017

CODES + SYMBOLS

STEPHANIE YEE

URSULA JOHNSON

JORDAN BENNETT

Ursula Johnson: Weaving history

Ursula Johnson: Weaving history

Johnson is concerned that Mi’kmaq baskets will become obsolete, referenced only in archives or glanced at as artifacts on the dusty shelves of art collectors.
Unearthing buried histories of African Nova Scotian artists

Unearthing buried histories of African Nova Scotian artists

"Chris! I have been secretly waiting for this email for decades! Talk to me."
Landon Mackenzie’s hidden creative journey

Landon Mackenzie’s hidden creative journey

“People thought I was a guy. I kept secret that I had three kids. I kept secret that I was a woman.”
Amery Sandford: Master of ceremonies

Amery Sandford: Master of ceremonies

Amery Sandford draws upon the history of touristic paraphernalia, such as postcards and brochures from the early 20th Century that depicted North America as a pristine escape from the cultural and economic troubles of one’s homeland—a new frontier....
Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann's oil and Instagram works are in dialogue with the rich tradition of European painting. Wellmann's pushing both mediums and proving the timeless potency of the unsettling image.
Exhibition Listings
La femme dans la Lune / Her Head in the Clouds

La femme dans la Lune / Her Head in the Clouds

Catherine Bolduc’s new work creates a fantastical space that blends the figure of Christopher Columbus with the strange, rocky, moon-like terrain found on parts of the west coast of Newfoundland. This immersive contemporary art installation constructs a new reality through video, collage, and large-scale drawings in ink and watercolour. Bolduc uses the language of fiction, maps, archival documents, and travel journals to re-imagine an extraordinary place. This work draws on a six-week 2015 artist residency at Gros Morne National Park, offered in partnership by The Rooms and Parks Canada.

Catherine Bolduc, La Femme dans la lune / Her head in the clouds (detail), Mixed media, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

Open Studio artist-in-residence

Open Studio artist-in-residence

Beth Frey is a Montreal-based artist working in drawing, sculpture, installation and performance. Using humour and pathos, Frey examines the boundaries and ruptures of the body as sites of growth and creativity vis-a-vis the boundaries and ruptures intrinsic to the art objects she creates.

 

The Skewed Persona

The Skewed Persona

Gallery 1

In the age of the ‘selfie’ what does it mean to take a portrait of oneself? Three artists based in photography who work with their own bodies have each created a self-portraiture series in which they explore and challenge the conventional aspects of portrait photography. Each series highlights a different struggle the artist faces throughout their day to day life including feminist issues, mental illness, and fear of inadequacy. Through each individual series these photographic artists strive to share their experience with others and seek comparison with viewers who may be struggling with some of the same issues.

Inuit Fine Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut

Inuit Fine Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut

SakKijâjuk – a Labrador Inuit term meaning, “to be visible” – highlights the little known craft and artworks produced in Nunatsiavut (the Inuit region of Labrador) over half a century of exciting, diverse production. The exhibition features the work of dozens of artists in photography, sculpture, painting, clothing, drawing, printmaking, basketry, film, video, and the textile arts. The exhibition opens at The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery before touring across Canada.

Michelle Baikie, The Hunter, 1998, 35.56 x 25.4cm, digital photograph, Collection of the artist

Parallel Journey, Works on Paper 1975-2015

Parallel Journey, Works on Paper 1975-2015

Landon Mackenzie is a Vancouver-based artist known for her large-format abstract paintings. This exhibition features rarely seen works on paper from the past four decades produced in Berlin, Paris, Banff, Prince Edward Island, and Vancouver.

The Nature of Nature: The Photographs of Thaddeus Holownia, 1976-2016

The Nature of Nature: The Photographs of Thaddeus Holownia, 1976-2016

The Nature of Nature celebrates forty years of production from one of Canada’s leading photographers, the New Brunswick-based Thaddeus Holownia. This exhibition offers insight into Holownia’s art-making from the late 1970s to the present day and features newly created works on exhibition for the very first

Firmly located within the North American documentary genre, Holownia’s work is engaged with the histories of photography and of places. His unique practice, using predominantly analogue technologies, merges high craft with prolonged inquiry as his projects span years if not decades.

As Holownia states:

The meaning that resides in my bodies of work goes beyond visual description; they stand as a history of the play between human intervention and the landscape. The result is both an anecdote of an ordinary place and a metaphor for our relationship to place and environment. What emerges is a sense of vulnerability and the inexorable force of time.

Together with an attendant publication of the same title, The Nature of Nature: The Photographs of Thaddeus Holownia, 1976-2016 brings into focus the Maritime artist’s significant contributions to the photographic medium, providing the most comprehensive critical analysis of his practice to date.

áilleacht nádúrtha

áilleacht nádúrtha

Eric Boutilier-Brown’s newest exhibition, áilleacht nádúrtha (Irish for Beauty Unadorned) presents photographs of the Nude set within the sublime ruins and rich landscapes of Ireland. The show’s images are all centered upon Ingrid, who’s worked with Boutilier-Brown since 1998, and who accompanied him to Ireland in 2016 to create a portfolio marking his 30th year of photography. The exhibition features images drawn from that project; 12 selected by the photographer, and 12 selected by the model, Ingrid. Both classical and contemporary, Boutilier-Brown’s photographs of the Nude celebrate the body as a sensual and universal element within a larger setting of natural beauty and ancient ruins, revisiting and refreshing this traditional artistic theme.

Eric Boutilier-Brown, Dryad’s Leap, digital photograph, 2016

 

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

During their 2016 artist residency at The Rooms, Meredith Carruthers and Susannah Wesley became fascinated by the many stories of people losing track of time and place while berry-picking and the associated folkloric narratives that attempt to explain this phenomena. Using archival images, sound, and berry-dyed fabrics, they reflect upon how perception can shift to disorientation even in the most familiar landscapes.

Leisure,  Narrative no. 9, Digital photograph, 2016

Florilegia

Florilegia

Beth Biggs’ work engages with symbols, signs, gender classification and their social and political implications. The installation of her work explores the tension between the intimate nature of jewellery and the public space of the gallery.

Beth Biggs, Seduced: Chrysanthemum, sterling, copper enamel, cast, fabricated, 25x12x1.5cm, 2016. photo credit: Roger Smith

RE:collection

RE:collection

 RE:collection explores the building of a Canadian art collection in Charlottetown as both an optimistic mission and a reflection on the evolving country, its history, geography, people and communities. The diverse visions, observations, and ideas of artists represented within the collection allow us to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation with one of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s largest collections-based exhibitions and publication.

Robert Harris (1849-1919), The Studio Boy’s Private View, 1886, oil on canvas, 89.5 x 74.5 cm. Gift of an anonymous donor, 1978, CAG H-571

Kathleen Daly (1898-1994), Untitled (Young Man & Landscape), undated, oil on canvas, 96.5 x 83.8 cm.Gift of the Estate of Kathleen Daly, Toronto, Ont., 1994, CAG 94.5.60

Garry Neill Kennedy (1935-), Q (from Quid Pro Quo), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 274.3 x 213.4 cm. Gift of the artist, 2016, CAG 2016.3

CERA ALBA: L’alliage de l’éphémère à l’éternel

CERA ALBA: L’alliage de l’éphémère à l’éternel

CERA ALBA examines Acadian artist Romeo Savoie’s use of found objects and everyday naturally occurring materials, and how these might be reconfigured in his works to create new and unexpected meaning. The resulting body of work instigates innovative ways of relating organic and inorganic elements unto what can best be described as an “all-over” painterly surface.

Curated by Paul Édouard Bourque, this exhibition focuses on a pared-down selection of works produced during a time when Savoie was seriously questioning the role of the found object in a work of art, and how this issue relates to the overall scheme of his oeuvre. Modular elements figure prominently in the building-up of the pieces, with various references to grid-work and multiples; these are combined with superimposed diptychs and sectional pieces designed to dominate larger areas once installed.

Savoie’s exuberant uses of beeswax, twigs, branches, glass and faded flower petals are brazenly combined with his trademark painterly application of saturated pigments onto a textured, heavily worked-up surface of either canvas or wood panel. These works address the artist’s perennial questioning of the value judgements inherent in the representation of reality, and how mere worldly materiality might somehow lay claim to notions of the eternal.

Recent work by Romeo Savoie. Photographed at his studio in Barachois, 23 September 2014.

Roméo Savoie, Glass, Mixed media on wood, 2013. photo credit: Mathieu Léger

 

INTENTIONS

INTENTIONS

Curators Alexe Hanlon and Anna Murphy add to the tradition of Prayer Flags with this group exhibition of local textile work. Inspired by Tibetan Prayer Flags, artists express their individual interpretations of this tradition. The works exhibited are a representation of how a person’s energy is directed into the world, using a variety of textile techniques to articulate these intentions. Flags of all styles, including some unconventional varieties, express each artist’s own spirit as they draw inspiration from aspects of their own lives that bring them joy and fulfillment. Common contemporary prayer flag themes include aspirations of goodwill and positivity as a part of the message the flag is intended to send out into the world.

 

 

More Exhibition Listings »

Latest articles
Marigold Santos' hybrid selves

Marigold Santos’ hybrid selves

Inspired by the terrifying tales of mythical monsters she connected with as a child, Marigold Santos unravels her memories and experiences to form her own personal myths, inspiring viewers to do the same.
Christopher Boyne blurs lines between ‘artist’ and ‘non artist’ actors

Christopher Boyne blurs lines between ‘artist’ and ‘non artist’ actors

Christopher Boyne’s practice often revolves around maritime life and the sea. Born and raised on the east coast of Nova Scotia, his relationship with the ocean is intimate.
Tracing the gestures: Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard find everyday wonder on the Magdalen Islands

Tracing the gestures: Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard find everyday wonder on the Magdalen Islands

Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard were to deny the Google Maps or other formal ways of mapping the area and seek the unwritten in the unexpected.
Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

In an art world unbeholden to market forces, what’s the correlation between the jurors of funding councils and awards to who they render visible and the image of Canadian that presents to the rest of the world?
Disappearing Terrain

Disappearing Terrain

There’s a soft delicacy in the works that comprise Rilla Marshall’s Liminal Project, which makes the realization of its decidedly uncomfortable subject matter all the more jarring and arresting.
Going there: The playful pain of Neil LaPierre

Going there: The playful pain of Neil LaPierre

Delving into the personal and surreal, Neil LaPierre is committed to bringing the HA-HA’s into art discourse.
Liberated Form

Liberated Form

Richard Mueller is not so interested in coherent pictorial space or literal depiction as in the potential of formal arrangements to engender associative and emotional responses “independent of literal language.”
Echoes across time and space

Echoes across time and space

L’Acadie Mythique, a travelling exhibition that recently visited the Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery, is curated by Harlan Johnson and features nearly twenty different artists from across the Acadian diaspora.
Q + A: Jordan Bennett

Q + A: Jordan Bennett

Visual Arts News was excited to feature the work of artist Jordan Bennett in our Fall 2015 issue. In this online installation of her interview series, Current Conditions & Forecasts, Eryn Foster chats with Bennett about everything ranging from his experiences representing Newfoundland in Venice to his work bringing traditional Indigenous art forms into contemporary art discourse. ERYN FOSTER: You...
The strange new world of Bridget Moser

The strange new world of Bridget Moser

In this installation of the Visual Arts News Podcast, our new host David Dahms picks artist Bridget Moser's brain about her latest show at MSVU Art Gallery in Halifax, Bridget Moser: Is This Thing On.
Found in the Fog

Found in the Fog

  As we walked downtown, my friend described how two old hags had chewed on either side of her neck the night before. It wasn’t the first time. “I’ve learned that the trick,” she told me, “is that I just have to let it happen, to remind myself that it’s not real.” This was a...
Retracing the past

Retracing the past

Cathy Busby displays the artworks that the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s first director, Moncrieff Williamson, acquired half a century ago on a shoestring budget ahead of a royal visit from the Queen. Or at least, what was left of them.