The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2017

CODES + SYMBOLS

STEPHANIE YEE

URSULA JOHNSON

JORDAN BENNETT

Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann brings illusion to Instagram

Ambera Wellmann's oil and Instagram works are in dialogue with the rich tradition of European painting. Wellmann's pushing both mediums and proving the timeless potency of the unsettling image.
Amery Sandford: Master of ceremonies

Amery Sandford: Master of ceremonies

Amery Sandford draws upon the history of touristic paraphernalia, such as postcards and brochures from the early 20th Century that depicted North America as a pristine escape from the cultural and economic troubles of one’s homeland—a new frontier....
Looking back: Our version of "women in the arts" in the 70's

Looking back: Our version of “women in the arts” in the 70’s

The 70's art world "was a desert for women! Let alone any person of colour!” But in 1977, in the second issue of Visual Arts News, we published a list of publications focusing on "women in the arts."...
Exhibition Listings
A Retrospective

A Retrospective

Brenda Francis Pelkey: A Retrospective

Place and landscape are central to Pelkey’s subject matter, as were people until 1994. Many of her photographs of landscapes and architectural interiors are consciously staged, by means of lighting effects, protracted exposure, mirroring, and the addition of text and auditory components.

The exhibition includes nine bodies of work by the nationally recognized photographic artist Brenda Francis Pelkey, dating from 1988 through 2015. Pelkey lives in Windsor and has made major photographic series in Ontario, Saskatchewan and rural Nova Scotia, where she has resided in the past.

Cold Nights

Cold Nights

in the rOGUE: Cold Nights is a collection of illustrative portraits of varying media. The work is embedded with imagery representative of my hometown in Labrador and the east coast of Newfoundland—through botany, wild animals and landscapes. The portraits are illustrative in style and express my interest in storytelling, design and painting. Each piece of Cold Nights is its own experiment in color, narrative and illustrative style. Collected over a few years, the creation of Cold Nights was a slow and therapeutic process. Over that time, I navigated through the waters of being a post-BFA artist to becoming a full-time student again while also trying to continue my artistic practice. The resulting work is a collection of smaller travel-friendly pieces, in media ranging from sketchbook pages to digital paintings.

Sam Moss is an ex-Haligonian born in Labrador City, and currently living in St. John’s. She graduated with a BFA from NSCAD University in 2014, and is currently studying Computer Engineering at Memorial University. When not debugging code, she likes to draw/make/destroy things.

You Are Here

You Are Here

Opening Reception: Thursday, April 6, 6 – 8pm
Artist Talk: Sunday, April 16, 2pm

In this new series of work Roxanne has been responding to media representations of people and places. With this body of work she is asking the viewer to consider the ordinary world that surrounds them. Roxanne has been a member of ViewPoint Gallery since 2004, and has art work in the collection of the Canada Council Art Bank, the Nova Scotia Art Bank, the collection of Mount St. Vincent University Art Gallery, and in private collections.

I Never Want To Grow Up

I Never Want To Grow Up

Recent NSCAD University graduate Erin Hollingshead has created a new body of work, which incorporates imagery that delves into the inner child into powerful portraits of adult women. Stuffed animals and classic childhood items add colour and excitement into some pieces, while others portray more child-like body language.

Fruit Bowl

Fruit Bowl

Gallery 2A
Artist presentation: Thurs 16 March, 12 Noon

Maradyn-Jowsey offers, “Fruit Bowl resides at the intersection between whimsical squiggles and crisp design. The ceramic pieces and upholstered furniture in this exhibition have been fuelled by my delight for exploring materials and foraging for pattern, texture, and colour. Through clay, I record ‘mish-mash’ mark-making; I pinch, squeeze, and smooth surfaces into forms which tenuously masquerade as both functional and sculptural objects. As an antidote to the mass-produced products that inhabit our homes, I intend to imagine alternative ways to activate our domestic spaces by considering their surfaces, forms, and spatial features.”

Machinari

Machinari

Machinari is an invitation to escape.

A sequence of tableau shots becomes a window, a breach into another reality.

The artist thwarts the viewer’s gaze and manipulates the image in order to give dimension to photography: a form of resistance to the immateriality of the digital process.

The result is a layering of space and time; a slow oscillation between disappearance and revelation.

Léna Mill-Reuillard works with images, whether photographic, videographic or cinematic. She holds a bachelor’s degree in cinema and a master’s degree in visual and media arts from the Université du Québec à Montréal. Her work has been shown at the Galerie de l’UQAM, the gallery Les Territoires and at Centre VU. Several films on which she has worked as director of photography have travelled to numerous festivals.

 

 

Site web : lenamillreuillard.com

Golden Moons

Golden Moons

Naturally Dyed & Handwoven, each moon piece is bisected horizontally between sky and ground or water, and collectively they ask questions about location, space, scale, concreteness, control. As we speed up in all our interactions, the slow, incremental woven, dyed progress of these pieces seems satisfying and rich, and possessing of serenity.

Frances Dorsey, Black Moon, handwoven and naturally dyed fibres,2015. photo credit: image courtesy of the artist

Frances Dorsey and Rachel Morouney, Black Moon and Crenellated Fan,handwoven and naturally dyed fibres, carved and glazed ceramic, 2015. photo credit: images courtesy of the artists

 

In Some Far Place

In Some Far Place

In 1977, a flamingo landed on the coast of Newfoundland and was immediately shot. Now preserved in the collection of The Rooms, the strange story of how this tropical bird came to be in its final resting place far from home is the starting point for this contemporary art exhibition that explores the inherent absurdity and poignancy of collecting behaviour. What motivates us to collect? How do we choose what to include and exclude from our collections and exhibitions? Artworks by local, national, and international artists are bought together with a selection of works from The Rooms Permanent Collections that have never before been exhibited. Throughout, works that incorporate song and voice elude to absence and elegy, but also to the limitless power of sound to exclaim presence, even when there is no “room” for physical inclusion. The end result is a sumptuous, poetic experience for the eyes, and ears.

David R. Harper, Learning to Love You (detail), Wood, steel, cast polymer with virgin paper pulp, photo paper, enamel, paint.2015. photo credit: Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Sara Cwynar, Soft Film, 16mm film transferred to digital video, 2016

 

Call and Response: Collages and Paintings

Call and Response: Collages and Paintings

Opening Reception: Wednesday, March 1, 7pm-9pm

Photomatic Travelling Tintype Studio

Photomatic Travelling Tintype Studio

Opening Reception: Friday, February 3rd, 2017 | 6:00PM – 8:00PM

Many visitors to last year’s Lumière Arts Festival will remember Karen Stentaford’s travelling tintype studio, which was located in downtown Sydney at the top of Charlotte Street. The Sackville-based photographer spent the evening making portraits using the 19th century tintype technique and made pictures of dozens of visitors using the now-rare photographic process. The results of this work will be on display at the CBU Art Gallery in conjunction with the ‘Proletariart’ community art exhibition.

Karen Stentaford is an artist and educator who works primarily in medium and large format photography, often employing toy cameras and alternative processes. Since 2012, much of her work has been made using the wet plate collodion process—glass negatives and tintypes. Her recent bodies of work investigate ideas of place and memory influenced by the Newfoundland landscape of her childhood. Karen is the photography technician and lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts at Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB.

Postcards from Cuba

Postcards from Cuba

The photographs in the Postcards from Cuba exhibit were taken in March 2014 when the photographer, Kathleen Flanagan, visited Havana, the capital city of Cuba, and Remedios and Caibarien, two small coastal cities in Cuba.  The images depict Cuba before the impact of recent major events – the lifting of the 50-year American embargo in December 2014, the election of Donald Trump on November 8, 2016, and the death of Fidel Castro on November 25, 2016.  Guided by documentary traditions, the images depict a country in transition as seen with a visitor’s eye and empathy.

Kathleen Flanagan, Girl with keys, Caibarien, Cuba, March 2014

The Nature of Nature: The Photographs of Thaddeus Holownia, 1976-2016

The Nature of Nature: The Photographs of Thaddeus Holownia, 1976-2016

The Nature of Nature celebrates forty years of production from one of Canada’s leading photographers, the New Brunswick-based Thaddeus Holownia. This exhibition offers insight into Holownia’s art-making from the late 1970s to the present day and features newly created works on exhibition for the very first

Firmly located within the North American documentary genre, Holownia’s work is engaged with the histories of photography and of places. His unique practice, using predominantly analogue technologies, merges high craft with prolonged inquiry as his projects span years if not decades.

As Holownia states:

The meaning that resides in my bodies of work goes beyond visual description; they stand as a history of the play between human intervention and the landscape. The result is both an anecdote of an ordinary place and a metaphor for our relationship to place and environment. What emerges is a sense of vulnerability and the inexorable force of time.

Together with an attendant publication of the same title, The Nature of Nature: The Photographs of Thaddeus Holownia, 1976-2016 brings into focus the Maritime artist’s significant contributions to the photographic medium, providing the most comprehensive critical analysis of his practice to date.

More Exhibition Listings »

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