The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: Spring 2017

ORDER + CHAOS

RACHEL BEACH
GRAEME PATTERSON
RITA MCKEOUGH + MORE

Looking back: Our version of "women in the arts" in the 70's

Looking back: Our version of “women in the arts” in the 70’s

The 70's art world "was a desert for women! Let alone any person of colour!” But in 1977, in the second issue of Visual Arts News, we published a list of publications focusing on "women in the arts."...
Call for Artist Pages

Call for Artist Pages

Visual Arts News invites all Atlantic Canadian print media/paper-based artists to create new works for our Special 40th Anniversary Edition of the magazine. The bonus issue is scheduled to be released in December 2017. We will commission up...
Holding space with Rachel Beach

Holding space with Rachel Beach

That these pieces “live” as they do is overwhelmingly apparent in Mid-Sentence; they exist in conversation with each other across distance and time, a living interaction, and they evoke a sense beyond the physically sculptural, beyond image, to...
Walking With Our Sisters pays homage to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Walking With Our Sisters pays homage to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Community members commemorate each individual life lost: "They are sisters, mothers, aunties, daughters, cousins, grandmothers, wives and partners. They have been cared for, they have been loved, they are missing and they are not forgotten."
Mocean Dance animates its past in lightening speed

Mocean Dance animates its past in lightening speed

At fifteen years, the 2016 Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia Masterworks Arts Award winner Mocean Dance is one of the longest surviving contemporary dance companies in Atlantic Canada and well-known for its highly physical, collaborative work.
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
La femme dans la Lune / Her Head in the Clouds

La femme dans la Lune / Her Head in the Clouds

Catherine Bolduc’s new work creates a fantastical space that blends the figure of Christopher Columbus with the strange, rocky, moon-like terrain found on parts of the west coast of Newfoundland. This immersive contemporary art installation constructs a new reality through video, collage, and large-scale drawings in ink and watercolour. Bolduc uses the language of fiction, maps, archival documents, and travel journals to re-imagine an extraordinary place. This work draws on a six-week 2015 artist residency at Gros Morne National Park, offered in partnership by The Rooms and Parks Canada.

Catherine Bolduc, La Femme dans la lune / Her head in the clouds (detail), Mixed media, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

Postcards from Cuba

Postcards from Cuba

The photographs in the Postcards from Cuba exhibit were taken in March 2014 when the photographer, Kathleen Flanagan, visited Havana, the capital city of Cuba, and Remedios and Caibarien, two small coastal cities in Cuba.  The images depict Cuba before the impact of recent major events – the lifting of the 50-year American embargo in December 2014, the election of Donald Trump on November 8, 2016, and the death of Fidel Castro on November 25, 2016.  Guided by documentary traditions, the images depict a country in transition as seen with a visitor’s eye and empathy.

Kathleen Flanagan, Girl with keys, Caibarien, Cuba, March 2014

Elbow Room Residency

Elbow Room Residency

Jennie Williams was born and raised in Labrador in the most southern Inuit region in the circumpolar Arctic. She photographs people in their everyday environments and circumstances, working to document practices and traditions in the manner that they are celebrated today in Labrador. Recent bodies of work reveal her deep interest and love for Inuit cultural traditions, especially the photographic series Nalujuk Night, shot in Nain where she lives. At a summer residency at The Rooms, Williams will develop a new portrait series of urban Inuit living in St. John’s.

The exhibition is part of the Elbow Room Residency Series

Jennie Williams, Nalujuk, photograph,2015.  Courtesy of the artist

 

The Sensual World

The Sensual World

Opening Reception: Friday 3 March, 7:00 pm

Owens Art Gallery, Mount Allison University

The Owens Art Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibit, The Sensual World, on Friday 3 March 2017 at 7:00 pm.

The Sensual World is an exhibition of works by five contemporary Canadian artists working in and around comics. The artists are Marc Bell, Elisabeth Belliveau, Jessica Campbell, Julie Doucet and Eli Howey. While all related to comics, the works in The Sensual World span a wide array of mediums and sizes, and include textiles, print, collage and animation.

The Sensual World is curated by Patrick Allaby, Owens Art Gallery Intern for the 2016-17 academic year. The exhibition will remain on view until 2 April.

The opening of The Sensual World will be followed by the closing reception of Start Gallery’s February Exhibitions from 8:30 to 10:00 pm and an after-party for both Owens and Start events at Thunder & Lightning beginning at 10:00 pm.

Living Lightly on the Earth: Architecture of the Ark for Prince Edward Island, 1976

Living Lightly on the Earth: Architecture of the Ark for Prince Edward Island, 1976

Built in 1976 by Solsearch Architects and the New Alchemy Institute as “an early exploration in weaving together the sun, wind, biology and architecture for the benefit of humanity,” the Ark bioshelter integrated ecological design features to provide autonomous life support for a family. Opening day mixed counterculture together with official culture: Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, Premier Alex Campbell, Whole Earth Catalog compiler Stewart Brand, and hundreds from PEI’s counterculture settlements, and the neighboring traditional communities. Thousands more would visit the Ark over its short life. The exhibition explores the story of the Ark for PEI, and its architectural vision of life led in collaboration with nature.
Curated by Steven Mannell and produced by Confederation Centre Art Gallery with the assistance of the Canada Council for the Arts.

David Bergmark and Ole Hammarlund of Solsearch Architects at the southeast corner of the Ark for Prince Edward Island, n.d.

Golden Moons

Golden Moons

Naturally Dyed & Handwoven, each moon piece is bisected horizontally between sky and ground or water, and collectively they ask questions about location, space, scale, concreteness, control. As we speed up in all our interactions, the slow, incremental woven, dyed progress of these pieces seems satisfying and rich, and possessing of serenity.

Frances Dorsey, Black Moon, handwoven and naturally dyed fibres,2015. photo credit: image courtesy of the artist

Frances Dorsey and Rachel Morouney, Black Moon and Crenellated Fan,handwoven and naturally dyed fibres, carved and glazed ceramic, 2015. photo credit: images courtesy of the artists

 

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Opening Reception: Friday October 7, 2016 4:00-6:00PM

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away is an exhibition that commemorates 2016 as the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Canada. Women first earned the right to vote in Canada in 1916 but it was not until 1960 that all Canadian women, regardless of ethnicity or Indigenous status were eligible to fully participate in the political process.

Featuring artwork by over 15 women artists from the Cape Breton University Art Gallery’s collection and three new works by contemporary Canadian artists, Kinuk (Dartmouth, NS) comprised of Ursula Johnson and Angella Parsons, Diane Borsato (Toronto, ON) and Anne Morrell Robinson (Margaree Valley, NS) in collaboration with the Ocean Waves Quilt Society (Cape Breton Island, NS), and D’Arcy Wilson (Halifax, NS) who completed an artist residency at CBU Art Gallery in July 2016.

The artists presented in this exhibition have unique connections to Cape Breton, whether they were born and raised, lived and worked, or visitors to the region with lasting impressions, these women have shaped and been shaped by the island, its people and the dynamic landscape.

Image: Lindee Climo, Lady of Gustavia, 1978.

Alas

Alas

Lorraine Field’s exhibition Alas is a photographic response to the loss of her husband and companion of some five decades, poet Roger Field. Situating her own body within landscapes that simultaneously depict new growth and decay, Field uses her photographs and Roger’s poetry to explore both the personal and universal experiences of loss and aging.

Lorraine Field, Leveled, Year 1, Photograph, 2012. photo credit: Lorraine Field

How Do I Look?

How Do I Look?

This selection of artists’ self-portraits from the Mount Saint Vincent University Collection addresses both the experience of being looked at by others, and that of returning the gaze. As a corollary to their engagement with practices of looking and appearing, these self-portraits also tackle the frameworks of race, gender and sexuality.

In her extended photographic self-portrait, Rosalie Favell exposes the intersectional consequences of coming out as an Indigenous lesbian. Works by the African Nova Scotian artists Chrystal Clements and Jim Shirley confront the racializing gaze in inventive ways. Replacing images with words, Marie Koehler tackles and triumphs over patriarchal objectifications of women’s appearance. Sarra McNie, on the other hand, subsumes the representation of her nude figure in the formal problems of modernist painting.

Image: Rosalie Favell, Living Evidence, 1994.

Matuitine to Mesonoxian

Matuitine to Mesonoxian

Gallery 2B

Curator Erica Flake offers, “Matutine refers to the early morning, before the sun, and before dawn. Conversely, Mesonoxian pertains to the dead of night; the midnight hours. Through digital and analogue mediums, five photographic artists explore the meaning of these words within the concept of liminality: the ambiguous state occurring when a transformation begins but is not complete. By manipulating light and shadow, the Photo Gang Collective have produced works embodying the notion of the ‘in-between’.”

Mi’kmaq Word of The Day 2.0

Mi’kmaq Word of The Day 2.0

A re-visitation of a previous project from 2010, where Bennett was in residence at Plug-In Institute of Contemporary Art in Winnipeg and he received Mi’kmaq language lessons via instant messaging from Johnson. This new work will be presented in the digital format of an audioscape and a daily drawing of text sent by the artists to Eastern Edge Gallery, the growth of this exhibition will echo the organic nature of the relationship between land, language and sustenance. The artists would like to invite the residents of St. John’s, Ktamkuk to witness the growth of the installation while learning the Mi’kmaw language, in exchange for a donation of a non-perishable food item to the exhibition for the St. John’s Native Friendship Centre.

Ursula Johnson is an emerging performance and installation artist of Mi’kmaw First Nation ancestry. She graduated from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design and has participated in over 30 group shows and 5 solo exhibitions. Her performances are often place-based and employ cooperative didactic intervention.

Jordan Bennett is a multi-disciplinary visual artist of  Mi’kmaq ancestry from Stephenville Crossing Ktaqmkuk (Newfoundland). Jordan holds a BFA from Sir Wilfred Grenfell College and a MFA from University of British Columbia Okanagan. He has shown extensively nationally and internationally, in venues such as The Museum of Art and Design, NYC; Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe, NM; Campbelltown Art Centre, Campbelltown, AUS, and was one of two artists to represent Newfoundland and Labrador at the 2015 Venice Biennial at Galleria Ca’Rezzonico, Venice, Italy.

Jordan’s ongoing body of work utilizes various mediums to explore land, language, the act of visiting, familial histories and challenging colonial perceptions of indigenous histories, stereotypes and presence with a particular focus on exploring Mi’kmaq and Beothuk visual culture of Ktaqmkuk (Newfoundland).

Putting Life to Work

Putting Life to Work

Ibghy & Lemmens’ art practice investigates the ways in which the economic sciences and the theories of management represent the world. It focuses on the influence of productivist logic on human activity.

This first in-depth exhibition of their work in Canada looks at the internalization of productivity by individuals. The installations, sculptures, videos, and performative projects examine the ways in which the injunction to perform affects the body—actions, thought, attitudes, language—from the point of view of work and life, two spheres that tend to be conflated within a model that many researchers refer to as “cognitive capitalism”.

Produced by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery/Concordia University. Also presented at Owens Art Gallery, Mount Alison University, January 20 to March 12 2017

Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens title of work: Each Number Equals One Inhalation and One Exhalation (Detail), installation and mixed media, 2016. photo credit: Paul Litherland

Richard Ibghy & Marilou Lemmens title of work: Is there anything left to be done at all? Multi-channel video installation, sound and mixed media, 2014. photo credit: Paul Litherland

More Exhibition Listings »

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