The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2017

REBUILD

EMILY PITTMAN

BRENDAN FERNANDES

RAVEN DAVIS

Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane's controversial legacy

Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane’s controversial legacy

Visual Arts News' research intern explores the legacy of two NFB films from the '70s—One film portrayed Indigenous people in visual art, while the other depicted Indigenous people as visual art.
Steele + Tomczak collect strangers' confessions

Steele + Tomczak collect strangers’ confessions

The works in The Long Time transmit the sense that you’re missing or meeting something, getting just a trace of what came before and what is coming next.
Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Artists Kyle Alden Martens and Emily Lawrence both create playful work that subtly destabilizes traditionally heteronormative arenas—sports for Martens and mainstream porn and Martha Stewart cooking demonstrations for Lawrence.
The myth of home

The myth of home

Jerry Ropson’s to kiss a goat between the horns is a memorial to a cultural vernacular and way of life that has already left us—his grandfather's rural Newfoundland culture.
Exhibition Listings
We Shall See

We Shall See

 

Ian Willms father died after months of hospitalization and medical interventions due to a motorcycle accident. In We Shall See Willms documents his father’s traumatic injuries and the details of daily hospital visits. Despite their fraught familial relationship, Willms’ father encouraged him to photograph their “journey through unknown emotional terrain, in collaboration.” Unframed and printed on fragile tracing paper, the photographs depict the complexities of love, grief and mortality.

Ian Willms’ is an award-winning photojournalist based in Toronto and founding member of Boreal Collective.  We Shall See is presented in conjunction with Photopolis: The Halifax Festival of Photography.

Image: Ian Willms, Sister and I at the hospital, Inkjet print, 2014.

 

Shane Song

Shane Song

Opening: Wednesday Sept 6,  6 – 8pm

Where I Live

Where I Live

This new body of work represents how I see my home; the places and spaces in which I walk. I’ve often found the strongest compositions to be bourn from the unpredictable and the decisive moment.

I majored in photography at NSCADU and have been using my photographs as my inspiration for this collection of images. I must admit, my first love is drawing and so I’ve been exploring the concepts of combining photography with drawing along with watercolour to give a unique and graphic quality.

Halifax and Dartmouth are wonderful places to explore; full of old and new examples of architecture all blended together in one landscape. Moody skies, windy streets that lead from one Maritime treasure to another keep my perspective fresh and full of enthusiasm.

 

IMAGE 1

artist name: Craig Baltzer

title of work: Untitled

media: Ink and Watercolour on Board

year: 2017

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

During their 2016 artist residency at The Rooms, Meredith Carruthers and Susannah Wesley became fascinated by the many stories of people losing track of time and place while berry-picking and the associated folkloric narratives that attempt to explain this phenomena. Using archival images, sound, and berry-dyed fabrics, they reflect upon how perception can shift to disorientation even in the most familiar landscapes.

Leisure,  Narrative no. 9, Digital photograph, 2016

Stand Back, Come Closer

Stand Back, Come Closer

This exhibition is the third collaboration by these two veteran printmakers. In Warren’s work, the body speaks. Her’s is the expressive language of hands, feet and torsos. Come close to enter intimate, detailed landscapes of muscle, tendons and fluid line. Viewers will have to take many steps back to grapple with Hainstock’s 4’x4′ monsters. His subject is the changing landscape of rural place and threatened viability.

Sally Warren, Waiting For The Miracle, offset drypoint on gelatin plate, 2017

Bob Hainstock, Urban Domino, Mixed Media on Rust Collagraph Print, 4’x4′, 2017

Greer View Mirror

Greer View Mirror

A selection of witty sculptural works from 1972 to 1990 by the Nova Scotia-based artist John Greer, all shown at the Isaacs Gallery in Toronto. Curated by Pan Wendt

John Greer, Take Some Respondability, 1974, epoxy clay, steel spoons, paper, 29 x 21 x 23 cm Courtesy of the artist.

New Paintings & "Slow Century"

New Paintings & “Slow Century”

Kim and Andy are both exploring the idea of nostalgia and shared memories, through popular objects in popular culture or recent history.

Andy MacDonald, Slow Century, Acrylic on Board, 2017

Kim Floyd, Parking Ramp, Kim Floyd , Acrylic on Board, 2017

 

 

 

Ropeworks

Ropeworks

Mixed media artist Violet Rosengarten‘s vibrant exhibition, Ropeworks, is composed of painted surfaces and painted rope on wood or canvas. These colourful textured reliefs play with the natural way that rope meanders, entangles and coils. Her colour choices refer to sea voyages to other cultures, the warming of the ocean, the colours of shells, corals, and seaweed, the fluorescence of buoys and other aspects of maritime culture.

This is Judy

This is Judy

Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador annex Gallery

A series of exuberant hooked rugs by Nova Scotia based artist Laura Kenney, which tell the story of irrepressible Judy, an eccentric but delightful character that lives in a hooked rug universe that the artist describes as “animated abstraction”.

 

 

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

The Gallery is very pleased to announce two significant contributions to the permanent collection that were received in 2016. Because we have very limited resources for the purchase of artworks, the Gallery relies on donations, of both acquisitions funds and artworks, to expand the collection, an activity that greatly enhances our ability to foster an appreciation and understanding of the visual arts within the Dalhousie University community, and to be a resource for our local and regional communities.

DANA CLAXTON: THE MUSTANG SUITE

This iconic series of five large-scale photographs by Dana Claxton, a Vancouver-based artist of Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux ancestry, spans considerations of popular western culture and assimilation, and Indigenous identity and representation. The suite presents staged portraits of members of a contemporary Indigenous family posing with various refigured mustangs: a muscle car, a banana-seat bicycle, a pony, and a white woman with horse blinders and mouth bit. Exhibited at the Dalhousie Art Gallery in 2011 as part of the National Gallery of Canada’s touring exhibition “Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists”, The Mustang Suite is distinguished for its incisive and provocative humour, impeccable technical production, and its many layers of social commentary and critique.

The acquisition was made possible through the generosity of the artist, financial contributions from Alumni members of Dalhousie University’s Schulich School of Law, and support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisitions Grants program. Assistance with the transportation from Vancouver of the framed photographs was provided by TOTAL Museum and Fine Arts Services, Toronto

Main Lands and Long Winters

Main Lands and Long Winters

After moving to Bonavista, artist Jane Walker joined a group of women who got together once a week at the Legion to work on textile projects, chat, and have tea and snacks. She spent much of the winter  — matting season — working on a series of steel wool rug works, both at home and at the Legion. With this new body of work, Walker poetically responds to the history of craft in this province, while exploring a key narrative of its history: imagining “elsewhere” as a place for a better life, and realizing that what is most supportive and beneficial is often nearby.

Jane Walker, Looking East, Steel wool, metal mesh, pine, salt water (Troon), 2017. photo credit: The Rooms

 

Patti & Lawrence

Patti & Lawrence

Patti & Lawrence is a video projection by Paul Wong that uses found images and personal film footage to construct narratives on growing up Queer and Asian. It is presented in partnership with the Prismatic Arts Festival, Canada’s only multi-arts festival featuring culturally diverse and Aboriginal artists.

Paul Wong, Patti 21&25, Video, 2016

 

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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