The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2017

REBUILD

EMILY PITTMAN

BRENDAN FERNANDES

RAVEN DAVIS

Beyond a seat at the table

Beyond a seat at the table

Black contemporary artists constantly have to explain themselves to be accepted into the dominant framework. Their work is often defined as activism, without their consent, merely because it is presented from their own worldview.
Brendan Fernandes' hybrid ghosts

Brendan Fernandes’ hybrid ghosts

"For me growing up in East Africa and living in the Western world, when I first came, there was always this idea that I was exotic."
Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane's controversial legacy

Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane’s controversial legacy

Visual Arts News' research intern explores the legacy of two NFB films from the '70s—One film portrayed Indigenous people in visual art, while the other depicted Indigenous people as visual art.
Steele + Tomczak collect strangers' confessions

Steele + Tomczak collect strangers’ confessions

The works in The Long Time transmit the sense that you’re missing or meeting something, getting just a trace of what came before and what is coming next.
Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Artists Kyle Alden Martens and Emily Lawrence both create playful work that subtly destabilizes traditionally heteronormative arenas—sports for Martens and mainstream porn and Martha Stewart cooking demonstrations for Lawrence.
The myth of home

The myth of home

Jerry Ropson’s to kiss a goat between the horns is a memorial to a cultural vernacular and way of life that has already left us—his grandfather's rural Newfoundland culture.
Exhibition Listings
We Met Online: Finding Each Other

We Met Online: Finding Each Other

Stephanie Wu is a first generation Chinese-Canadian artist and educator based in Tkaronto. Through use of sculptures, projections and installations, they examine the intersections between queer identity, race, religion, mental health, suburbia and the online world.
www.stephanie-­‐wu.com

We Met Online: Finding Each Other is a video and sculpture based exhibition that explores the lack of intersectional queer and trans spaces in a predominately Westernized queer culture. Queerness and mental health are often portrayed with the exclusion of people of colour and the queer/trans community. This has led many queer/trans people of colour to go online in search of visibility, community, support and a sense of belonging.

This work will be delved into throughout a month long residency and series of public engagement opportunities as part of the 2017 KREAM program. See below for full event schedule and venue access notes.

Lunch Break: Open Studio Visit with Stephanie Wu – 12-2PM Tuesday, September 19th 2017

Bring your lunch over to the Khyber Centre for the Arts and join artist-in-residence Stephanie Wu for an open studio visit. They will be making pieces for We Met Online: Finding Each Other and discussing their process. This is an informal drop-in event, is open to the public and no registration is required.

Under the Moon: Reception of We Met Online: Finding Each Other, Potluck and Colouring Party6-9PM Friday, September 22nd 2017

In various Chinese myths, the moon symbolizes human emotions, gentleness and reunion. Come gather under the moon with other QTPOCs for the opening of We Met Online: Finding Each Other and an evening of food sharing and colouring. Stephanie Wu will create hand-drawn colouring books at the KREAM residency for visitors to keep and large colouring sheets for group colouring. Bring a dish and email info@khyber.ca with your dietary restrictions along with your favourite karaoke song! This is a substance-free, all-ages event open to QTPOCs and allies.

Artist Talk with Stephanie Wu – 6-730PM Thursday September 28th 2017

Stephanie Wu will discuss their art practice and their experience making We Met Online: Finding Each Other. They will also facilitate an activity on self-care, mental health and creating safer spaces for QTPOCs. This event requires registration, with a maximum of 10 participants who are QTPOC and allies. To register email info@khyber.ca.

Arthur Lismer and the Halifax Explosion

Arthur Lismer and the Halifax Explosion

Arthur Lismer and the Halifax Explosion

This exhibition highlights the work that Arthur Lismer, influential principal of the Victoria School of Art and Design (now NSCAD University), produced during his time in Halifax from 1916 to 1919. With the exception of the large oil painting Halifax Harbour—Time of War, from Dalhousie Art Gallery’s own permanent collection, the works presented are a selection of preparatory drawings and oil sketches that were made in situ as the artist explored the city and shorelines on foot. These were not made with the intention of public display—they are observational and documentary, and served an instrumental purpose in Lismer’s overall development of large studio paintings.

The legacy of this ambulatory field work is its contribution to our understanding of Halifax’s history, both civic and military, during World War One. Among the most significant of these works are his chronicles of the Halifax Explosion, few of which are known to still exist. Today, their significance lies not only as a record of a formative time in Nova Scotian history, but also in the insight they offer into the working mind and hand of one of Canada’s most renowned painters during the years that preceded the founding of the Group of Seven in 1920.

When One Space Meets Another

When One Space Meets Another

 

A new installation by Sackville artist Leah Garnett which draws upon her childhood experiences growing up around construction sites and the woods of rural Maine.

When One Space Meets Another is curated by Pan Wendt, and co-organized by the Confederation Centre Art Gallery and the Owens Art Gallery.

 

 

Holding Patterns

Holding Patterns

Main gallery

Textile artist Rachel Ryan investigates the various meanings suggested by her title, whether it is pattern in the textile sense or breaking free of the “holding pattern” of military wife and daughter.  In this mini-retrospective, the artist takes us through six years of her nature-based imagery with a mosaic quality.  Mainly autobiographical in theme, she explores the role of being a female artist and mother in our contemporary world.  Ryan’s most recent works evoke the evolving awareness of women.

Ryan Rachel – Fire And Water –Fabric Collage -2012

EPHEMERA

EPHEMERA

This exhibition deals with artifact and thought, and their shifting presence in contemporary society. Things we think of as permanent become transitive in this installation. Landscapes, objects, and ideas mix with other ephemera in Jennifer Morgan and Caroline Clarke’s prints and three-dimensional artifacts.

 

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Circulated by the Foreman Art Gallery Curated by Carl Johnson

This touring exhibition brings together 15 years of works by Brazilian-Canadian artist Giorgia Volpe, whose multidisciplinary practice often fosters relationships and dialogue —whether through fleeting interventions, public performances, or art objects. In particular, Volpe draws from remnants that end up in recycling centres or landfill sites, working with readily available materials and discards. Volpe often relies on weaving to develop her works, blending found materials as a metaphor for complex human relations, and inviting us to look differently at what already exists.

Girogia Volpe, La grande maille – Labyrinthe (detail),  mixed media, 2015

 

Eight Drawings for Invisible Cities

Eight Drawings for Invisible Cities

​Opening 6pm Thursday 23rd November.
This set of drawings are based on the orchestral score of Solea di Diomira by Dinuk Wijeratne. The drawings themselves are strongly influenced by Cy Twombly’s work titled Poems to the Sea. Within the drawings are visual references to Joan Mitchel’s abstract aesthetics. And finally, the original music by Dinuk Wijeratne is an homage to Italo Calvino’s book titled Invisible Cities.

The gist of these drawings are to remind viewers that new art is often influenced by the art of other artists. My take on this paradigm is to adopt the idea directly and fully give credit to the artists who inspired and influenced this work. The only novelty may be the notion of using music for the compositional structure, I should add that it is not the sounds of the recorded music that is used but the actual score which is used as the visual motif.

Lastly, the final passage of text of Calvino’s Invisible Cities is a plea to respect and facilitate those who make our present day existence more tolerable. These drawings may serve as  an enticement for more people to read his book and discover the passage for themselves”  –  Patrick Rapati

This is Judy

This is Judy

Craft Council of Newfoundland and Labrador annex Gallery

A series of exuberant hooked rugs by Nova Scotia based artist Laura Kenney, which tell the story of irrepressible Judy, an eccentric but delightful character that lives in a hooked rug universe that the artist describes as “animated abstraction”.

 

 

Forged

Forged

Photographer Steve Wadden documents the steel-working neighbourhood of Whitney Pier, Cape Breton. Shot over a ten-year period, the photographs document an era of sharp economic downturn in the region, following the closure of Sydney’s steel plant on its 100th anniversary in 2001. Forged records the city’s devastation and re-construction in the years following economic collapse and documents the community’s cultural responses to the city’s changing circumstances, while preserving the memories of steel-working’s heyday.

Steve Wadden, Untitled, 2005

 

 

Negotiations

Negotiations

The Hydrostone neighbourhood, now nearly one hundred years old, is one of the most striking legacies of the Halifax Explosion. It stands as a powerful testament to the reconstruction efforts required to house the working-class families who were left homeless by the events of the Explosion. For many, however, the Hydrostone’s appeal lies in its unique ability to express the passage of time: in this neighbourhood, layers of the present co-exist with traces of the past. The original grey granite ‘hydrostone’ blocks live anachronistically side-by-side with a dizzying array of wood, composite, and vinyl siding materials. Extensions have been added, shutters have been removed, exterior walls have been painted, porches have been closed in, and trees, shrubs, and gardens have been cultivated.

Halifax artist Claire Hodge has systematically photographed all of the existing homes to create a portrait of the changing face of a landmark neighbourhood. Hodge notes, “The Hydrostone townhomes reveal a complex set of negotiations realized tacitly or explicitly by the people who have lived there. Some blocks of houses are united in their aesthetic vision. Others seem to attest to greater individualist streaks and look strangely disjointed. Most often, the blocks of houses suggest a series of compromises between harmony and difference, between the ‘greater good’ and tenacious individualism.”

Gallery 3
Artist Talk: Fri 29 September, 4:30PM
Doucette’s exhibition presents a new version of history, shedding light on our colonial past, reframing key figures and exposing false ideas. He offers, “My work stems from the hypothesis that historyis a lie that no one ever questions. Often artists were obligated to convey an official message, sometimes largely tainted by political motivations, thus evoking an incomplete version of the facts. This is certainly the case of the artists who represented the history of the Acadians in Canada. It is a history that is often a one-sided perspective from a Colonial British viewpoint which presented the Acadian population in terms of a problem that needed to be solved.”

Bio: Mario Doucette is an Acadian artist from Moncton, NB. He is a painter, but also works with video, digital animation, performance and Super8 film. He has been featured in many exhibitions in several Canadian museums and galleries, notably at Toronto’s ROM where he was a Sobey Art Award finalist in 2008. Generously supported by Canada Council for the Arts and Arts NS.

Oh! Canada

Oh! Canada

OPENING RECEPTION: September 21, 2017 at 6pm

This year marks the sesquicentennial of Canadian Confederation. On 1 July 1867 the existing United Province of Canada was divided to become the new provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and two other colonies, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, also became provinces of the new Dominion of Canada.

To mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Nova Scotia Designer Crafts Council, now known as Craft Nova Scotia, challenged our members to create works exploring their Canadian identity and/or celebrating Canadiana.

The works selected by our invited jurors, Patricia McClelland, Pamela Ritchie, and Phil Secord, range from varying representations of national symbols such as the maple leaf and Canada goose, to personal stories from the immigrant’s perspective, to thoughtful explorations of Canada’s history and current affairs. Together, the works in Oh! Canada present a multi-faceted, multi-layered view of being Canadian in 2017. -Susan Hanrahan, Executive Director, Craft Nova Scotia
Artists: Marla Benton, Berkeley Brown, Wilma Butts, Frances Dorsey, Linda Finley, Al Hattie, Violeta Izquierdo, Laura Kenney, Wendy Landry, Heather Lawson, Paula MacDonald, Dawn MacNutt, Alexandra McCurdy, Margot Metcalfe, Carol Morrow, Randy Mugford, Wendy Murray, Christina Parker, Nancy Price, Jim Smith, Vaughan L. Smith, Kas Stone, Isako Suzuki, Andrea Tsang Jackson, and Stephen Zwerling.

More Exhibition Listings »

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