Confederation Centre Art Gallery

Tyler Los Jones: Look slowly and all that moves

Aggregate No. 2, 2018, archival ink on rag paper, edition of 5, 60.9 x 60.9 cm

Tyler Los Jones: Look slowly and all that moves

This exhibition presents new work by the Banff-based artist, developed from a residency in PEI in 2017. The show consists of images and objects that braid together three strands of inquiry: an investigation into organisms on PEI that stabilize dynamic, shifting environments; the relationship between present-day marine life on the east coast and the ancient seas that comprise the Rockies in Alberta; and the material history of photography and expanded photographic processes. Curated by Pan Wendt.

Supported by Alberta Foundation of the Arts, and the RBC Foundation.

Brian Burke: Figure/Ground, a Retrospective

Tickets, 2007, oil on canvas. Gift of Judith Scherer, 2018

Brian Burke: Figure/Ground, a Retrospective

Brian Burke (1952-2017) was one of Prince Edward Island’s most significant visual artists of the past century. Mostly self-taught, although he did study briefly under Eric Fischl at NSCAD, Burke was a painter with a distinct personal style. His works addressed social roles, alienation, and the absurd in darkly humorous figurative images. This exhibition sums up Burke’s career, ranging from his rough and direct early work, through his time in New York and his major exhibition Mister Man, to his last decade, when he worked in Luzern, Switzerland, and includes loans from many private and public collections. The exhibition is curated by Pan Wendt and sponsored by CN.

Split Images: Truth and Fiction

Jack Chambers, Stuart Shaw Mixing reds and Greens, 1965, oil over glue and marble dust on wood and plywood, 132.1 x 193 cm, CAG 66.7

Split Images: Truth and Fiction

Real and invented worlds clash or coexist in this selection of works from the collection.

Shuvinai Ashoona: Mapping Worlds

Shuvinai Ashoona, The World in Her Eyes, 2011, Fineliner and coloured pencil on paper. Courtesy TD Bank Group Art Collection. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Shuvinai Ashoona: Mapping Worlds

This exhibition features pencil crayon and ink drawings produced by Ashoona over the past two decades.

Organized and circulated by The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto. Sponsored by TD Bank Group and supported by major donors The Schreiber Sisters and Anonymous.

Philippa Jones: Perpetual

Philippa Jones, Suspended, 2018, resin, nylon, plywood frame, MDF, black canvas, gold leaf and organic materials found, grown, foraged and gathered by the artist

Philippa Jones: Perpetual

The Newfoundland-based artist considers mortality, reanimation, and the manipulation of time in images and multimedia installations based on samples from nature.

Supported by the RBC Emerging Artists Program.

 

Fast Forward

Skawennati, Family in the Sky, Machinimagraph from The Peacemaker Returns, 18:39, 2017

Fast Forward

This exhibition of short videos presents imaginings of the near future. The works share both fantastic and troubling outlooks, while exploring historical contexts and technological shifts to better understand our current trajectory.

In the Balance

Lionel Stevenson, Erratic #4, 1999, digital print on paper. Purchased, 2012

In the Balance

This exhibition highlights objects from the collection that generate a tension between formal control and the innate shaping properties of the materials of art—their density, structure, colour and texture. These works focus more on internal dynamics than they do on recognizable content—the relationship between an idea, figure or process and the consistency of its “support,” whether beeswax, whalebone, acrylic paint or Masonite. Focusing primarily on ostensibly formal issues these works actually reveal in their structure a resistance to persistent myths with social and ecological implications—the autonomy of the artistic statement, and the elevation of the artist to the status of a commanding, godlike shaper of inert material. In these works, artists confront a problem—the necessity of making a gesture that is at the same time receptive to the impact of other forces. The works ultimately oscillate between presenting a unifying solution and a disharmony that pulls them apart, opening them to the larger world.

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