The Rooms

Photography in Canada: 1960 - 2000

Photography in Canada: 1960 – 2000

Experience the diversity of Canadian photographic practice and production from 1960 to 2000 in this exhibition organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada. Bringing together 77 works by 51 artists including Raymonde April, Edward Burtynsky, Lynne Cohen, Angela Grauerholz, Michael Snow, Jeff Wall, and Jin-me Yoon — it explores how the medium articulated the role of art and the artist in an ever-changing world, along with differing ideas of identity, sexuality and community. Formulated around themes such as conceptual, documentary, urban landscape and portrait, this exhibition celebrates the enormous growth of the practice, collection and display of photography over more than four decades.

Organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada. Sponsored by Scotiabank, Founding Partner of the Canadian Photography Institute

Jin-me Yoon, Souvenirs of the Self (Lake Louise), chromogenic print laminated to Plexiglas, 1991, printed 1996. photo credit: CMCP Collection, National Gallery of Canada. Purchased 1996

 

Over Time

Over Time

 

Trained as a printmaker, St. John’s artist Hazel Eckert collects found images from various sources, and explores how they alter over time through multiple reproductions such as repeated photocopies. Modified by chance and the characteristics of available technology, the images take on a life of their own as each version becomes distanced from the original context—decaying and mutating to the point of abstraction. Eckert documents the process in a series of textiles, allowing an immersive consideration of the physical nature of materials, and the changing cultural ancestry of imagery.

This new body of work was created as part of the Elbow Room Residency Series.

Hazel Eckert, Drift (detail), Photocopied image printed on textile, 2017.

I Don’t Get It

I Don’t Get It

Co-commissioned by Gallery 44, The Western Front (Vancouver) and The Rooms (St. John’s)

A Canadian media artist currently based in Los Angeles, Aleesa Cohene uses found footage, sculpture, and sound to reflect a disparity in the way Black and white bodies are represented in the cultural imagination. By working with imagery from contemporary Hollywood films, Cohene poses questions for herself and the viewer: How do my personal politics contribute to what is happening around me? How do I make room for other systems of representation to come into being?

Aleesa Cohene, Whoa (Roses as Chrysanthemums), inkjet print, 2017

The Fever

The Fever

 

With this new body of work, St. John’s artist Rhonda Pelley reads the past, present, and future of Newfoundland and Labrador with tarot cards collaged from photographs of the province’s politicians, historical events, buildings, and other aspects. Rather than overt commentary, the cards allow reflection upon the viewer’s ideas of the negative and positive aspects of this province as interpreted through its most recognizable imagery. By creating an opportunity to reflect upon biases, Pelley invites the viewer to thoughtfully guide the outcome of the province.

Rhonda Pelley, The Emperor,  digital collage, 2018

 

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Circulated by the Foreman Art Gallery Curated by Carl Johnson

This touring exhibition brings together 15 years of works by Brazilian-Canadian artist Giorgia Volpe, whose multidisciplinary practice often fosters relationships and dialogue —whether through fleeting interventions, public performances, or art objects. In particular, Volpe draws from remnants that end up in recycling centres or landfill sites, working with readily available materials and discards. Volpe often relies on weaving to develop her works, blending found materials as a metaphor for complex human relations, and inviting us to look differently at what already exists.

Girogia Volpe, La grande maille – Labyrinthe (detail),  mixed media, 2015

 

Truth or Myth?

Truth or Myth?

The next installation of Truth or Myth? draws on the permanent collection to explore the changing relationship between cultural identity and food in Newfoundland and Labrador, as portrayed by artists such as Grant Boland, Martin Lyons, Derrick Pottle, Mary Pratt, and Helen Parsons Shepherd.

Grant Boland, High Class Candies, oil on canvas, 2002. Photo credit: The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Collection

Share