The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2017

REBUILD

EMILY PITTMAN

BRENDAN FERNANDES

RAVEN DAVIS

Home Economics: 150 Years of Canadian Hooked Rugs

Home Economics: 150 Years of Canadian Hooked Rugs

 

Organized and circulated by the Textile Museum of Canada (LOGO must be included) Curated by Shauna McCabe, Natalia Nekrassova, Sarah Quinton and Roxane Shaughnessy

Featuring over 100 hooked rugs from the Textile Museum of Canada, this exhibition explores the unique histories of rug hooking across the country. With examples ranging from early Canadian settlers to today’s thriving art practices, the exhibition celebrates folk culture in Canada while considering how craft and commerce are deeply entwined.

 

Hooked Rug Quebec, Canada (T77.0093), 1920 – 1930. photo credit: Courtesy of the Textile Museum of Canada

Hooked Rug Lunenberg, Nova Scotia, Canada, From the Opekar/Webster Collection (T94.0357), c. 1950. photo credit: Courtesy of the Textile Museum of Canada

A Going Concern: Contemporary Textiles and Everyday Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador

A Going Concern: Contemporary Textiles and Everyday Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador

The artists in this exhibition represent a vibrant, ongoing conversation in this province. They draw upon Newfoundland and Labrador’s rich textile traditions to provide deceptively playful commentary on serious subject matter. In various ways, they focus attention on what is often outside official histories, asking pointed questions about politics, labour, value, and the definitions of art itself.

Malin Enstrom, Speed Bump, Wool on burlap, 2017. photo credit: Courtesy of the artist

Main Lands and Long Winters

Main Lands and Long Winters

After moving to Bonavista, artist Jane Walker joined a group of women who got together once a week at the Legion to work on textile projects, chat, and have tea and snacks. She spent much of the winter  — matting season — working on a series of steel wool rug works, both at home and at the Legion. With this new body of work, Walker poetically responds to the history of craft in this province, while exploring a key narrative of its history: imagining “elsewhere” as a place for a better life, and realizing that what is most supportive and beneficial is often nearby.

Jane Walker, Looking East, Steel wool, metal mesh, pine, salt water (Troon), 2017. photo credit: The Rooms

 

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Circulated by the Foreman Art Gallery Curated by Carl Johnson

This touring exhibition brings together 15 years of works by Brazilian-Canadian artist Giorgia Volpe, whose multidisciplinary practice often fosters relationships and dialogue —whether through fleeting interventions, public performances, or art objects. In particular, Volpe draws from remnants that end up in recycling centres or landfill sites, working with readily available materials and discards. Volpe often relies on weaving to develop her works, blending found materials as a metaphor for complex human relations, and inviting us to look differently at what already exists.

Girogia Volpe, La grande maille – Labyrinthe (detail),  mixed media, 2015

 

Gretzky is Everywhere

In collaboration with the Art Gallery of Alberta and the Confederation Centre Art Gallery

The simulcast exhibition presents Andy Warhol’s celebrated 1984 print Wayne Gretzky 99 at several galleries across the country at the same time – by live feed from each venue — to consider both the pervasive nature of hockey player Wayne Gretzky’s image in Canadian culture, and the mass reproduction of celebrity images that was central to Warhol’s practice.

to kiss a goat between the horns

Jerry Ropson is part of a new generation of Newfoundland and Labrador artists who explore what it means to come home. After a long time away, Ropson chose to spend a year reconnecting with his hometown of Pollards Point. This installation brings together drawings, video, and sound to provide an informal and compassionate look at everyday life in rural Newfoundland — ranging from family history, to conversations in sheds, to hunting excursions on the land. During the first week of the exhibition, visitors will have the opportunity to speak with Ropson as he works in the gallery space.

jerry ropson, moose shanks, cellphone photograph, 2016

 

 

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

During their 2016 artist residency at The Rooms, Meredith Carruthers and Susannah Wesley became fascinated by the many stories of people losing track of time and place while berry-picking and the associated folkloric narratives that attempt to explain this phenomena. Using archival images, sound, and berry-dyed fabrics, they reflect upon how perception can shift to disorientation even in the most familiar landscapes.

Leisure,  Narrative no. 9, Digital photograph, 2016

Truth or Myth?

Truth or Myth?

The next installation of Truth or Myth? draws on the permanent collection to explore the changing relationship between cultural identity and food in Newfoundland and Labrador, as portrayed by artists such as Grant Boland, Martin Lyons, Derrick Pottle, Mary Pratt, and Helen Parsons Shepherd.

Grant Boland, High Class Candies, oil on canvas, 2002. Photo credit: The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Collection