The Rooms

Michael Snow: Newfoundlandings

Michael Snow: Newfoundlandings

Curated by Scott McLeod and circulated by Prefix ICA, this exhibition brings together four video installations by Michael Snow, one of Canada’s most revered artists. As the exhibition title suggests, each of the presented works was produced on the west coast of Newfoundland, where the artist and his partner spend their summers among its cliffs, fields and coves. Unified by the omnipresence of the wind, the works also illustrate a number of Snow’s enduring preoccupations — sound, duration, and wordplay, as well as the nature of the frame, the camera, and the photographic act itself.

Image: Michael Snow. Video still from Condensation (A Cove Story), 2009. Courtesy the artist.

Emily Pittman: Unsettled

Emily Pittman: Unsettled

With this new body of work, Pittman has created abstract versions of the essential building blocks of community. A wall drawing and colourful forms suspended in space suggest churches, houses, lighthouses and other historic buildings. Pittman explores how concepts of community and home are carried with us. Communities are much more than a collection structures – their significance comes from our associations and connections to the people within. This work was developed during an Elbow Room Residency, a Rooms Provincial Art Gallery program that provides Newfoundland and Labrador artists at the beginning of their careers with the opportunity to work in a dedicated studio for three months towards an exhibition and publication.

Image: Emily Pittman. Working model for Unsettled. 2018. Painted foamcore and metal hardware. Courtesy of the artist.

Ned Pratt: One Wave

Ned Pratt: One Wave

A ten-year retrospective of Ned Pratt’s large-scale photographic works. Pratt’s respect for the landscape of Newfoundland is the foundation for his work. His formal approach consciously undermines compositional rules to produce sophisticated and unique imagery. His approach to the act of looking transcends place, however, installing him as a significant new voice in Canadian art. With accompanying catalogue, to be released November 2018, and a national tour into 2021.

Image: Ned Pratt. New Ferry (2016). Chromogenic print. 83.82 x 117.48 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Meryl McMaster: Confluence

Meryl McMaster: Confluence

Produced by Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa

An individual of mixed Plains Cree and Euro-Canadian heritage, McMaster explores the dimensions of her own sense of identity and the complex history of the photographic representation of Indigenous peoples. Three bodies of work in Confluence comprise arresting self-portraits that counter the stereotypical ways that Indigenous peoples have been, and sometimes still are, represented within a colonial framework, principally as objects rather than as subjects of the gaze.

Image: Meryl McMaster, Dream Catcher, Ink jet print, edition 2 of 2 AP, 2015. Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist, Stephen Bulger Gallery and Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain.

Future Possible: Art of Newfoundland and Labrador to 1949

Future Possible: Art of Newfoundland and Labrador to 1949

Gathering close to 100 artworks, images and objects from across The Rooms art gallery, archives and museum collections, this exhibition asks questions about how histories are told and re-told through images. How do these images define our understanding of this place? How does the past we imagine affect how we move into the future?

Taking place over two summers, this is the first of a ground-breaking look at the art history and iconography of Newfoundland and Labrador, starting with the period before Confederation in 1949. The exhibition places historical works in conversation with works by contemporary artists who reference real and imagined histories.

Image:
Anonymous, Artist sketching the St. John’s Harbour and skyline, photograph, c. 1910

photo credit: The Rooms

Truth or Myth?

Truth or Myth?

The next installation of Truth or Myth? draws on the permanent collection to explore the changing relationship between cultural identity and food in Newfoundland and Labrador, as portrayed by artists such as Grant Boland, Martin Lyons, Derrick Pottle, Mary Pratt, and Helen Parsons Shepherd.

Grant Boland, High Class Candies, oil on canvas, 2002. Photo credit: The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Collection

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