The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: Spring 2017

ORDER + CHAOS

RACHEL BEACH
GRAEME PATTERSON
RITA MCKEOUGH + MORE

Tove Storch Sculpture

Tove Storch Sculpture

Artist’s Talk – Saturday 25 February at 2 pm. Tove Storch will present an illustrated talk about her work. The event will take place in Seton Academic Centre, Room 503, followed by a reception in the Art Gallery.

Tove Storch’s first solo exhibition in North America follows a three-week production residency in the Art Gallery.  The young Danish artist has already exhibited at venues in Europe, New Zealand and Brazil. She recently completed a residency at the International Studio and Curatorial Program, New York.

Storch’s sculpture emphasizes process, physicality and the unique properties of materials.  These characteristics are reminiscent of minimalist and post-minimalist practices of the 1970s.  Her new work engages with the gallery’s two-storey architecture, deploying a forest of narrow metal rods to span the distance between floor and ceiling with an effect similar to that of a drawing.

Tove Storch, untitled, preliminary sketch

Tove Storch, untitled, preliminary sketch

How Do I Look?

How Do I Look?

This selection of artists’ self-portraits from the Mount Saint Vincent University Collection addresses both the experience of being looked at by others, and that of returning the gaze. As a corollary to their engagement with practices of looking and appearing, these self-portraits also tackle the frameworks of race, gender and sexuality.

In her extended photographic self-portrait, Rosalie Favell exposes the intersectional consequences of coming out as an Indigenous lesbian. Works by the African Nova Scotian artists Chrystal Clements and Jim Shirley confront the racializing gaze in inventive ways. Replacing images with words, Marie Koehler tackles and triumphs over patriarchal objectifications of women’s appearance. Sarra McNie, on the other hand, subsumes the representation of her nude figure in the formal problems of modernist painting.

Image: Rosalie Favell, Living Evidence, 1994.

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters

The Walking With Our Sisters – K’jipuktuk / Halifax planning committee would like the community to join us for the Pjila’si / Welcoming for Walking With Our Sisters on January 14 at 2pm, located in Mount Saint Vincent University’s McCain Centre Atrium (166 Bedford Highway). This will be followed by a feast and everyone is welcome to visit the Walking With Our Sisters commemoration in the MSVU Art Gallery afterwards.  There will be volunteers on site to help direct visitors to these locations.  All are welcome.

Walking With Our Sisters is a commemoration honouring missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and Two-Spirit people through ceremony, community and reflection.  It presents more than 1800 pairs of moccasin tops (vamps) made by contributing artists. The moccasins are unfinished, symbolizing over 1180 sisters, mothers, aunties, daughters, cousins, grandmothers, wives and partners whose lives were tragically cut short over the last thirty years.  This project has been entirely crowd-sourced and supported by thousands of Indigenous and non-Indigenous women and men across Turtle Island who care deeply about this issue. All of our efforts in bringing this exhibit to life have been on a strictly voluntary basis.

Walking With Our Sisters is rooted in the four principles of love, humility, protocol and volunteerism, and is guided by local Elders and community members. As Walking With Our Sisters is experienced in ceremony, footwear is to be removed before entering the space. Women are encouraged to wear skirts if they feel comfortable doing so.  Smudging (the burning of sage) will take place inside the MSVU Art Gallery, cleansing the space for the Sisters.  There will be no photography permitted at any time.  Public figures and dignitaries are welcome to attend but there will be no public speakers.