The cover of the current issue

Current Issue:

ANNA TORMA’S IMAGINARY WORLDS

ELEANOR KINGS DARK UTOPIA

THE NEW FACES OF FOLK ART

Physical Landscapes

Physical Landscapes

  While exploring Anatomica, I experienced several moments of disorientation, unsure whether I was approaching a piece with stronger connections to an artists’ studio or a laboratory. Take the human spine curving from a steel frame in the...
Art World Antidote

Art World Antidote

Folklore And Other Panics addresses the impossibility of “alleviating anxiety around elitism” in the contemporary art world. And further, according to the exhibition’s pamphlet, “the works provide a constellation of ideas, responding in various ways to themes of...
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
A measure of disorder: Seripop's exploration of entropy

A measure of disorder: Seripop’s exploration of entropy

Though some mark 50th anniversaries with gold, Séripop’s The Face Stayed East, the Mouth Went West marks the 50th anniversary of Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre by opening with more striking elements. Interested in exploring entropy in bright colours and on...
Exhibition Listings
John Greer: retroActive

John Greer: retroActive

John Greer: retroActive is a project celebrating over four decades of inspiring and enlightening production from one of Nova Scotia most important artists.  This exhibition offers insight into Greer’s artmaking from the late-1960s to the present day, featuring works from the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia’s Permanent Collection, key loans from outside sources, and new pieces created by the artist to be displayed publicly for the first time.  The artist’s profound influence and diverse production are thoroughly explored in John Greer: retroActive and within a fully-illustrated, hardcover book that accompanies this presentation at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

Res Ipsa Loquitur!

Contemporary First Nations Art from the Permanent Collection

Contemporary First Nations Art from the Permanent Collection

This exhibition showcases the changing currents in contemporary First Nations Art across Canada while offering insight into the breadth and diversity of this burgeoning area of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia Permanent Collection.

Image credit: Jane Ash Poitras, Pink Shamans, 1996, Mixed media on canvas, 244.0 x 186.7 cm. Purchased with the support of the Canada Council Acquisition Assistance Program and the Art Sales and Rental Society, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1997, 1997.130

Submission #1

Submission #1

abstract-s4-vans

 

Dark Utopian

Dark Utopian

Halifax artist Eleanor King’s practice fuses drawing, painting, performance, sculpture, audio, and video.  These and other genres come together in her immersive installations to consider a broader dialogue that promotes ideas such as recycling, sustainability and community.  Interactive elements invite the public to take part in a rich investigation of these and other weighty topics.  This Emerging Artist Series project will feature King’s most recent output as well as new works created at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

Eleanor King obtained a BFA from NSCAD University in 2001, where she has taught media arts courses and held the position of Director at Anna Leonowens Gallery.  She has shown her work nationally and internationally in exhibitions at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery in Charlottetown, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto, the Southern Alberta Art Gallery in Lethbridge, and Galleri F15 in Moss, Norway, among other venues.  In 2012, she represented Atlantic Canada for the Sobey Art Award .

King_CDWorm_2014_dimsvar

Key Frames

Key Frames

Key Frames playfully explores and questions the relationships between viewers and images. The “key frames”, taken out of their original context, invite the viewer to create meaning and construct narratives through associative and emotional response to colour, light and sequence.

Aviv Dror is an audio/video artist. Aviv graduated from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design University in 2011 with a double BFA in Intermedia and Jewellery. In his work, Aviv creates experimental audio/visual compositions, displaying his unique colour pallet and innovative editing process. Aviv’s work was screened in festivals and shows in Canada, Japan, Switzerland and Israel.

airborne

 

She said I have a French face

She said I have a French face

In this exhibition, text drawings and large-scale paper sculpture/drawings investigate the interstitial space between what we say and what we mean. Inspired by interactions with students, friends and strangers in Montreal, the work explores meanings behind the earnest, clumsy and odd things people say to each other. Adams states, “Meaning is discovered and inferred through our peripheral vision, and it is in those moments when the translation can be conceived.”

 

 

Standard Play

Standard Play

A series of imaginative conjectures based on memories of adolescent rituals of media consumption. The installation offers three interpenetrating scenes: two sisters have fallen asleep with the TV on (Sleepers); distorted voices offer an expressionistic tour of the inside of a VCR (Head Cleaner); and a supernatural feminine being appears as an apparition (Quantum Feminist Sanctorium). Materials and objects, in varying physical or mediated transfigurations, pervade each scene, as relics from one moment in a transformation from girlhood to womanhood. Tongue-in-cheek commentary on entertainment technology’s fraught relationship to individual agency and identity, and its role in the standardization of expression and behaviour, underlies a loosely suggested coming-of-age narrative.

Hand-drawn and digital animation, analog video effects, re-photography and video feedback transform images issuing from an apparently malfunctioning machine. The reflective surfaces of TV screens are implicated as projections onto glass within miniature sets.

Scene Otherwise

Scene Otherwise

Scene Otherwise features four recent photographic projects by the Artists Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge (Toronto ON), organized by Anna Leonowens Gallery and NSCAD U as part of the Mayworks festival taking place at The Khyber Centre for the Arts in Halifax NS. The projects look at the issue of climate change and it’s roots in capitalist development, the dual exploitation of migrant workers and the earth, the role of public institutions in the promotion of a democratic culture, and the recent Occupy movement that expressed a new type of resistance to the economic and environmental devastation of life.

The Artists often work with the communities involved in their projects. This exhibition includes works produced in collaboration with migrant agricultural workers (UFCW) and public cultural workers (members of CUPE). Condé and Beveridge will be present for a workshop and closing reception at the Khyber Tuesday 12 May, 2015 and will be receiving honorary degrees from NSCAD University at commencement May 16th, 2015.

Opening reception: 6PM Friday 17 April, 2015
Workshop: 6-8PM Tuesday 12 May, 2015 – “The Future of Precarious Work: A Workshop on Art, Labour and Activism” with Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge
Closing reception: 8PM Tuesday 12 May, 2015 – with Artists, the release of a limited edition poster and essay by Max Haiven

Drift

Drift

Space, colour, texture, and physicality in paint are rendered uniquely by artists Anna Cameron and Dana O’Regan.  Each presents landscape in very different ways.  These paintings can be read as meditations of our environment and our relationship with physical space.

Fluid abstraction, shifts in colour, moving boundaries, and an abundance of paint suggest “geological” formations in Dana O’Regan’s canvases –  which he calls sculptural paintings.  His “Reconstructed Landscapes” incorporate pre-constructed components added to the work, and sometimes partially removed or altered as the work progresses.   This process alludes both to the built environment around us and also to the building of the paintings.  O’Regan is fascinated by materiality, assemblage and process.   The outcome of a work is unknown but rather emerges through layering and time.

Anna Cameron’s interest in movement, surface quality, form, shadow, texture, and depth speaks to the poetry of nature.  Her landscapes include  earth and sky and engage the imagination of the viewer, inviting a curious and speculative gaze. Cameron allows colour, layering, and brushstroke to blend with her fascination about the changing earth to construct her paintings.  She creates mood, depth and vivacity.  Like a quilt made by a coming together of fabrics – each with their own history or story to tell, her marks are like souvenirs of events past that together shape the outcome and form the image with rhythm and movement. Cameron studied at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in Vancouver, graduating in 1997.

acameron

“We are continually exposed to the flashbulb of death”

“We are continually exposed to the flashbulb of death”

“We are continually exposed to the flashbulb of death”: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg (1953 -1996)

The exhibition comprises nearly 100 photographs taken by the legendary Beat poet and activist Allen Ginsberg, capturing his life, loves, and artistic community, including Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, Neal Cassady, Peter Orlovsky and others of the Beat generation of writers, poets, and activists. Diaristic captions handwritten by Ginsberg appear on the front of many of the photographs. The photographs are drawn from a collection of close to 8,000 prints recently donated by The Rossy Family Foundation to the University of Toronto Art Centre and the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

 

Silent Ice | Deep Patience

Silent Ice | Deep Patience

Opening Reception: Friday, March 20, 8 pm

Organised and circulated by the Art Gallery of Peterborough

Well known as a senior fibre artist, Dorothy Caldwell has produced for this exhibition works that can be seen as extensions of a drawing practice, realised through printing, staining, stitching, frottage and appliqué, whether on textile or on paper. All of these means of making a mark or stain have a deep history in relation to woven textile. In the new body of work that comprises

Silent Ice | Deep Patience, Caldwell continues her exploration of place: how we mark the land, and how it is visualised in mapping practices, both conventional and personal. Her research included extensive travel in both the Australian Outback and the Canadian Arctic. Both countries have large central wildernesses that are technically deserts; harsh landscapes in which indigenous populations have learned to survive, and that shape the way we view our respective countries.

Is This Thing On?

Is This Thing On?

Saturday, 6 June, 2 to 4pm – PERFORMANCE & OPENING RECEPTION

Join us for a performance by Bridget Moser. The 20-minute performance begins at 3pm.

Toronto-based performance and video artist Bridget Moser employs strategies associated with experimental theatre, performance art, modern dance, and prop comedy. Moser writes and acts out fragmented texts, combining language with everyday materials, which are used as props, and audio excerpts pulled from popular culture. These incongruous elements destabilize her props’ typical purpose and allow Moser to alternate between states of criticality and humour. There is an inherent struggle in Moser’s work as she attempts to reach an accord between herself and “things,” whether objects or ideas. The resulting artworks are affecting, entertaining and wildly unpredictable.

Bridget Moser: Is this thing on? presents a selection of videos and performance documentation including the new video, Memory Foam, recorded on-site at MSVU Art Gallery. A catalogue with essays by Stefan Hancherow and Sarah Hollenberg is available for purchase.

More Exhibition Listings »

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