The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2016

RILLA MARSHALL

JESSE JACOBS

RAY FENWICK

TONIA DI RISIO

Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

In an art world unbeholden to market forces, what’s the correlation between the jurors of funding councils and awards to who they render visible and the image of Canadian that presents to the rest of the world?
Disappearing Terrain

Disappearing Terrain

There’s a soft delicacy in the works that comprise Rilla Marshall’s Liminal Project, which makes the realization of its decidedly uncomfortable subject matter all the more jarring and arresting.
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Dialogues

Dialogues

Recent acquisitions by Allan Harding MacKay, Jinny Yu, and others are positioned in dialogue with existing collection works.

Cutline: Jinny Yu, Tiepolo Project, (detail),  2010, oil on aluminum, 163.8 x 1341.1 cm.  Gift of the artist, 2011

 

Parallel Journey: Works on Paper (1975-2015)

Parallel Journey: Works on Paper (1975-2015)

 

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Remotes

Remotes

 Opening Reception: Thursday, April 7, 2016, 6 – 8pm
Artist Talk: Sunday, April 10, 2pm

Each print in his series, Remotes, is the result of strategic hi-res scanning of an electronic TV or DVD remote controller, small sections of which have been cropped in squares, significantly enlarged and printed. The Remotes series plays upon effects resulting from shifts in scale. Through magnification, the viewer is alienated or detached from the device’s initial purpose and left to negotiate a micro-world of large coloured blobs, unfamiliar surfaces, decontextualized scraps of text, and various detritus (dust, human hairs, glue, etc.).

Janzen was born in Winnipeg and is located in Montreal. Janzen works in digital imaging, photography, video, installation, artist books, and other media. He has exhibited and worked as an artist-in-residence at diverse locations across Canada.

Glimpses of Eden

Glimpses of Eden

William Allderdice began painting when he retired as a professor of geography, studying under artists such as Gerald Squires, Tara Bryan, and Kathleen Knowling. Over the past two decades, he has created a prolific body of paintings and drawings that document memories from throughout his life, ranging from his early adventures (and mishaps) as a cowboy to his current life in The Battery neighbourhood of St. John’s.

Microorganism

Microorganism

Craft Council Annex Gallery

Sculptures, vessels and wall pieces will explore ornate details, textures and patterns found in our natural world.

ARTIST STATEMENT
In my work, I strive to give the observer a sense of time, place, and memory through imagery, color and texture. I often work in several mediums at once, including; printmaking, painting, collage, encaustic and most recently sculpting in ceramics. The process of layering is essential for developing a richness in depth. My compositions reveal an inner order or emotional logic to my observed world. Many of my artworks are compositions built up in sections inspired by the Newfoundland landscapes, and the plants and animals that are native to it. The natural world for me comprises elements that form distinct and perceptible patterns. Both ordered and chaotic in structure, these patterns embody elements of time, space and chance. The organization and layering of these patterns generates inner structures that form the basis of my work.

New Drawings

New Drawings

Originally from Calgary, Alberta, Charley Young holds an MFA from the Maine College of Art in Portland, Maine and a BFA from NSCAD University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Currently, Charley is Sessional Faculty at NSCAD University where she teaches traditional and unconventional approaches to drawing and printmaking. In June of 2014 Charley participated in the Arctic Circle Program- an expedition that led to the creation of site based work in the northern territory of Svalbard, Norway. Her new arctic drawings, influenced by this residency, engage with the relationship between landscape and artifact, and the intervention of human touch and visual perception.

 

Hazel Eckert

Hazel Eckert

Eastern Edge Rogue Gallery
A series of collages that explore the relationship between disparate elements and the point where they come together within a composition. Carefully chosen as graphic elements, favored for their abstract properties instead of their overt cultural reference, these non-representational works interpret the tension between fragmented narratives. The seam formed by a binding represents a margin of space that either joins or separates, enveloping the eye or giving it pause. By way of intuition and chance encounters within the collage process itself, Eckert endows found materials with an intended design and sense of purpose.
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New Paintings

New Paintings

Jennifer Hornyak’s paintings are neither mystical nor esoteric, nor do they attempt to explain. She is known for her colorful and highly textured still life paintings that walk a fine line between figuration and abstraction. Drawing inspiration from her surroundings, she is able to create paintings that are both intimate and universal. Her method of applying paint is distinctive and inimitable, revealing sophisticated colors and surfaces ridden with heavy accumulations of paint. Born in England, Jennifer studied at the Grimsby School of Art. Her work has been exhibited in prestigious galleries across North America, at international art fairs, and in many corporate collections. She works and lives in Montreal.

Secret Citadel

Secret Citadel

The Free World

The Free World

This exhibition focuses on a group of Bulgarian artists who immigrated to Canada in the 1990s through Gander as part of a mass defection from Eastern Europe. Vessela Brakalova, Luben Boykov, Elena Popova, Veselina Tomova, and Ellie Yonova remained in the province following their arrival, responding and contributing to the local arts community through their books, sculptures, mosaics, and paintings. “The Free World” is a reflection on their experience two decades later.

popovasmaller

I Will Meet You in the Sun

I Will Meet You in the Sun

Using print media as his language, Mitch Mitchell tests the limits of its fluency, never content to remain long on familiar ground. He takes great risks and insists, through large-scale installations, that printed matter matters, and is certainly not tied to the dimensions of a piece of paper or the size of a press bed. Discover the artist’s masterful interpretation of his own history through surprising works that take liberties with tradition and pull “print” into sculpture, performance and film.

Mitch Mitchell has long dealt with issues of labour and production, environment and technology, as well as the history of the print medium. His work over the past five years has shifted to matters more personal in nature: his own family history.The story, however personal, turns out to be quite universal, creating work about the very basic tenets of our shared humanity.

This body of work is based on Mitchell’s grandfather’s time in World War II as a radar technician, exploring the aftermath of his service and the war’s ripple effect globally, locally, and intimately within his own family.

The exhibition title is derived from a letter that Mitchell’s grandfather, Claude T. Mitchell, wrote to his grandmother, Francis Scott Mitchell, while posted in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands during the Second World War: “If I die, I will meet you in the sun”. His grandfather was the first to witness, through the blip on his radar screen, the explosion of Hiroshima. He would return to the Midwest, reluctant to stay in the military. He played baseball for the Chicago Cubs farm team before permanently injuring his arm, forcing him to return home to the coal mines in Danville, IL. Drawing on the expression “You must work the devil out”, he hoped physical labour would help exorcise the demons left by the war.

Mitchell’s family was not privy to his grandfather’s wartime history during his lifetime, as his record was only unsealed 10 years after his death. Mitchell was 15 years old when his grandmother revealed his grandfather’s role in the bombing; he has been digesting and exploring that history since. The works on view represent his response to this history.

Double Take

Double Take

A routine glance at a work of art sometimes leads to a double take—a delayed reaction to a surprising detail after the initial failure to notice anything unusual.   Selected from the permanent collection, the works in Double Take either are ‘assisted readymades’ (modified found objects) or, as ‘replicas,’ they resemble assisted readymades.  The second or third glance generally prompts second thoughts.

In combination, the painting/assemblage by Gerald Ferguson and sculptural objects by Marc Courtemanche and Kelly Mark bring art objects into problematic relationships with concepts of authenticity, categories of taste, and hierarchies of practice.

More Exhibition Listings »

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