The cover of the current issue

Current Issue:

ANNA TORMA’S IMAGINARY WORLDS

ELEANOR KINGS DARK UTOPIA

THE NEW FACES OF FOLK ART

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: EMERGING CRITICAL WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE

September – December 2015 To further develop critical art writing in this region, Visual Arts News will host a Writer-in-Residence in partnership with the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (AGNS). The residency will be open to emerging critical writers for a 4-month residency/internship and is designed to help develop and promote the work of emerging art critics. The successful applicant will hone writing and editing skills while learning production procedures at Visual Arts News and the AGNS Journal. This introduction to art-magazine publishing and writing is intended to foster new editorial and critical talent. Working closely with the Visual Arts News Editorial committee and mentorship from our Editor and the curators at the AGNS, the writer will receive valuable experience in writing about art, magazine publishing, art criticism and social media management. There will also be opportunities to meet with guest mentors involved in Canadian art publishing who will be...
Physical Landscapes

Physical Landscapes

  While exploring Anatomica, I experienced several moments of disorientation, unsure whether I was approaching a piece with stronger connections to an artists’ studio or a laboratory. Take the human spine curving from a steel frame in the...
Art World Antidote

Art World Antidote

Folklore And Other Panics addresses the impossibility of “alleviating anxiety around elitism” in the contemporary art world. And further, according to the exhibition’s pamphlet, “the works provide a constellation of ideas, responding in various ways to themes of...
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
A measure of disorder: Seripop's exploration of entropy

A measure of disorder: Seripop’s exploration of entropy

Though some mark 50th anniversaries with gold, Séripop’s The Face Stayed East, the Mouth Went West marks the 50th anniversary of Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre by opening with more striking elements. Interested in exploring entropy in bright colours and on...
Exhibition Listings
L’origine d’un mouvement

L’origine d’un mouvement

Manon Labrecque, apprentissage, installation : HD video and wall drawing, 2015. photo credit: Manon Labrecque

The exhibition brings together five recent installations. Manon Labrecque continues her exploration of themes that are dear to her: movement and what flows out of it, such as animation, slowing and stopping; the notion of the double; the muteness of a body; the relation between touching and looking; the significance of a memory; the present; experience. A figure is at the centre of each work. The visitor discovers a body, fragments of a woman’s body. She stops a movement, resumes an action, observes, draws, becomes indistinct. She thinks her shadow and tames it.

moulin_a_priere

Manon Labrecque, moulin à prières, kinetic and audio installation, 2015. photo credit: Manon Labrecque

 

 

Nothing is lost, everything is connected

Nothing is lost, everything is connected

About her exhibition, Lounder states, “This work started with an autumn walk along a river in Banff, and my view through the wolf willow trees lining the banks. Through this dense screen of bare branches, I could just make out the antlers of a bull elk moving across my field of vision. This exhibition includes a large drawing, and associated objects that suggest that nothing is lost in the circular relationships of prey and predator, stalker and stalked.”

Wallace Brannen 1952-2014

Wallace Brannen 1952-2014

This is a tribute to a bright young art student who found himself in the unique position of collaborating with cutting edge conceptual artists at NSCAD in the early seventies. His acquired skills as a Master Printer at the Lithography Workshop ultimately prepared him for the next ten years of his life, teaching and advising local and visiting artists on Baffin Island in the Northwest Territories. The next 30 years of his life crystallized his reputation as an expert art advisor in this region and he continued to be an artist and a mentor, especially after returning to art school in his later years.

 

Drawings from the Heart: Reproductions

Drawings from the Heart: Reproductions

“Drawings from the Heart: Reproductions” is the result of Delva’s engagement with a personal, portable EKG machine. In 2014, Delva was the artist-in-residence at the Hans Memling Museum and St. Jan’s Hospital in Bruges near his hometown in Flanders, Belgium. During his residency, he methodically spent time in a state of ‘deep looking’ at each of the paintings and artefacts in the museum while his portable EKG rendered his responses.

“Drawings from the Heart: Reproductions”, 2014. Painting: Hans Memling, “Diptych of Maarten van Nieuwenhove”, 1487, 2014. photo credit: Photo: Kristiaan Dekeijser

 

Narrative NL

Narrative NL

The exhibition features paintings by younger artists from the province whose work sets up evocative psychological and magical narratives. The artwork in the exhibition is roughly divided into two approaches:   one which relies on literal representation and often the juxtaposition of discordant images ; and a second which is more nuanced and layered and tends towards a psychological narrative.

Along the Way Oil

Hyperflat

Hyperflat

In the contemporary art exhibition Hyperflat, Toronto artist Jeannie Thib asks, “What if our contemporary built environments were based on ornamental botanical patterns?” Can “decorative” urban space lead to more caring relationships with our environment and with each other?

Thib uses high-tech design and fabricating techniques to rework decorative floral patterns borrowed from historical textiles and domestic surfaces. In doing so, she generates expansive reliefs and jewel-like models in contemporary industrial materials. Thib envisions botanical pattern – long marginalized as decorative and feminine, as surrounding landscape brought “home” beneath our feet. The artist replaces Modernist rectilinear design with differentiated space and thus restores ideas of the feminine and nature to the heart of world-making.

Circulated by Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery

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Masterworks from the Beaverbrook Art Gallery

Masterworks from the Beaverbrook Art Gallery

This monumental exhibition highlights the first and founding strength of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery – a permanent collection of extraordinary masterworks, the most significant and valuable art collection in Atlantic Canada, and one of the finest and most important holdings of British art in North America. Featuring extraordinary works of art by world-renowned artists, such as Gainsborough, Constable, Copley, Delacroix, Reynolds, Sargent, Sickert, Sisley, Sutherland, Turner, Freud, and Dali, and by seminal artists in the history of Canadian art, such as Krieghoff, Morrice, Harris, and Carr, it represents the remarkable legacy of the multi-millionaire business tycoon, newspaper publisher, politician, author, personal confidant of Sir Winston Churchill, and great philanthropist, Lord Beaverbrook, or Sir William Maxwell (Max) Aitken (1879–1964).

Making its homecoming stop on a North American tour that will continue after its exhibition here to the Judith & Norman Alix Art Gallery in Sarnia, ON, the exhibition will here only further enhanced with additional preparatory works and masterworks from the collection.

Turner
Organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and supported by the Museums Assistance Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, by Presenting Sponsor TD Bank Group, and by the law firm of McInnes Cooper.

The Worry Ladders

The Worry Ladders

Five fabricated ladders represent worries central to the artist’s understanding of environmental, economic, and political issues related to sustainability and stewardship of our forests.

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The Directed Lie

The Directed Lie

“The Directed Lie” consists of mechanical drawings, video and sculpture to explore the terrain of remembering, knowing, seeing and feeling. In 2009, Phillips trained as a polygraph specialist in Baltimore, Maryland, where she developed interrogation and lie testing skills. Since then, Phillips has invited 350 artist subjects to submit to a polygraph test which allowed her to build an archive of polygraph tests with art world subjects from Toronto, Paris, London, Dublin, Montreal, Vancouver, Berlin, Banff, Venice, New Smyrna Beach, Florida and, recently, Halifax.

Paulette Phillips, “The Directed Lie”, polygraph tests, year: 2009-2015. photo credit: Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Chromatrope

Chromatrope

An immersive painting installation based on early technological efforts in replicating the experience of space and time. Loosely mimicking the form of a zoetrope, Mensch’s paintings are hung in a dodecagon structure, functioning as the singular frames of a narrative sequenced in real time by the viewer.

The Interlocutor, 2015, oil on canvas, 121.9 x 91.4 cm

Imperial Designs: Samuel Holland's 1765 Map and the Making of Prince Edward Island

Imperial Designs: Samuel Holland’s 1765 Map and the Making of Prince Edward Island

Marking the 250th anniversary of Holland’s survey and map, this exhibition will explore how the map is a product of imperial rivalries and imperial policymaking for the British Empire and the critical role it played as a template for the settlement and development of PEI. Curated by Boyde Beck and Dr. Edward MacDonald

Cutline:  Samuel Holland’s 1765 manuscript map of St. John’s Island (now Prince Edward Island). On loan from The National Archives, UK, ref. CO 700/PrinceEdwardIsland3

Nam Nguyen

Nam Nguyen

The artist states, “In my paintings, I transform photographs that document my urban meanderings to subvert routine pathways of predetermined thought. Vernacular structures from the consumerist landscape, such as commodity displays and spectacle architecture, serve as raw material for ambiguous metamorphic transformation. Initially, the viewer must overcome the expectation for referential forms, before possibly accepting and pursuing the image as an experience of contemplative and poetic silence; a durational field of drifting thought and emotion.”

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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