The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: Fall 2016

MYTHS + MONSTERS

MARIGOLD SANTOS

AMBERA WELLMANN

WHITEFEATHER HUNTER

 

 

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Flesh and fiber

Flesh and fiber

WhiteFeather Hunter is creating living textiles: using her own hair, silk or gut sutures and mini 3D-printed looms and crochet hooks to weave scaffolding upon which connective tissue can foster.
TERROIR: A Nova Scotia Survey

TERROIR: A Nova Scotia Survey

Sunday Oct 2, 2:30 to 3:30pm Laura Kenney & Steven Rhude Thursday Oct 20, 7:00 to 8:30pm Mark Bovey, Melanie Colosimo, Angela Glanzmann and Charley Young Sunday Oct 23, 2:30 to 3:30pm  Steve Farmer, Christopher Webb and Jayé...
Marigold Santos' hybrid selves

Marigold Santos’ hybrid selves

Inspired by the terrifying tales of mythical monsters she connected with as a child, Marigold Santos unravels her memories and experiences to form her own personal myths, inspiring viewers to do the same.
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Opening Reception: Friday October 7, 2016 4:00-6:00PM

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away is an exhibition that commemorates 2016 as the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Canada. Women first earned the right to vote in Canada in 1916 but it was not until 1960 that all Canadian women, regardless of ethnicity or Indigenous status were eligible to fully participate in the political process.

Featuring artwork by over 15 women artists from the Cape Breton University Art Gallery’s collection and three new works by contemporary Canadian artists, Kinuk (Dartmouth, NS) comprised of Ursula Johnson and Angella Parsons, Diane Borsato (Toronto, ON) and Anne Morrell Robinson (Margaree Valley, NS) in collaboration with the Ocean Waves Quilt Society (Cape Breton Island, NS), and D’Arcy Wilson (Halifax, NS) who completed an artist residency at CBU Art Gallery in July 2016.

The artists presented in this exhibition have unique connections to Cape Breton, whether they were born and raised, lived and worked, or visitors to the region with lasting impressions, these women have shaped and been shaped by the island, its people and the dynamic landscape.

Image: Lindee Climo, Lady of Gustavia, 1978.

Comfort & Joy

Comfort & Joy

An annual holiday exhibition of finely crafted objects that evoke all the good things celebrated during this special time of the year.

COMFORT & JOY is a group exhibition that celebrates all the good things we associate with the holiday season: home, family and friends with the creativity, insight and good humour we have come to expect from our makers.  It can offer a contemporary and accessible interpretation of traditional and non-traditional activities and ideas associated with this season.

Kevin Coates, Splitting Wood for Winter, Wood carving, 2015. Photo credit: Ned Pratt

 

Living Lightly on the Earth: Architecture of the Ark for Prince Edward Island, 1976

Living Lightly on the Earth: Architecture of the Ark for Prince Edward Island, 1976

Built in 1976 by Solsearch Architects and the New Alchemy Institute as “an early exploration in weaving together the sun, wind, biology and architecture for the benefit of humanity,” the Ark bioshelter integrated ecological design features to provide autonomous life support for a family. Opening day mixed counterculture together with official culture: Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, Premier Alex Campbell, Whole Earth Catalog compiler Stewart Brand, and hundreds from PEI’s counterculture settlements, and the neighboring traditional communities. Thousands more would visit the Ark over its short life. The exhibition explores the story of the Ark for PEI, and its architectural vision of life led in collaboration with nature.
Curated by Steven Mannell and produced by Confederation Centre Art Gallery with the assistance of the Canada Council for the Arts.

David Bergmark and Ole Hammarlund of Solsearch Architects at the southeast corner of the Ark for Prince Edward Island, n.d.

Souterrain Expressions

Souterrain Expressions

Original carvings created by Canadian soldiers in 1917 in a cave 10 metres below Vimy Ridge are reproduced as 3D prints. Part of the UNB Art Centre’s 75th anniversary programming throughout 2016.

The Canadigm Group, Oscar Green, 3D recreation of cave etching, 1917/2016. Photo credit: The Canadigm Group

 

Inuit Fine Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut

Inuit Fine Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut

SakKijâjuk – a Labrador Inuit term meaning, “to be visible” – highlights the little known craft and artworks produced in Nunatsiavut (the Inuit region of Labrador) over half a century of exciting, diverse production. The exhibition features the work of dozens of artists in photography, sculpture, painting, clothing, drawing, printmaking, basketry, film, video, and the textile arts. The exhibition opens at The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery before touring across Canada.

Michelle Baikie, The Hunter, 1998, 35.56 x 25.4cm, digital photograph, Collection of the artist

Present Ground

Present Ground

Galleries 2&3
NSCAD / Parks Canada Partnership
Present Ground considers themes of exile, displacement, resilience, migration, culture and adaptation as they relate to the dichotomy between the past and the future of two of Nova Scotia’s National Historic Sites: Kejimkujik National Park and Fortress Louisbourg. Students from both the Parks Canada: Keji and Feminist Studio classes will participate in two separate group shows in Galleries 2 & 3 responding to this theme. The connections made during these residencies will serve as a conduit to link the recorded historical pasts of these locations with the fluid present.
Present Ground, as a framework, celebrates the resilience of nature and human cultures. It celebrates adaptability, mutability, and the melding of knowledge across time and geography.

Machinari

Machinari

Machinari is an invitation to escape.

A sequence of tableau shots becomes a window, a breach into another reality.

The artist thwarts the viewer’s gaze and manipulates the image in order to give dimension to photography: a form of resistance to the immateriality of the digital process.

The result is a layering of space and time; a slow oscillation between disappearance and revelation.

Léna Mill-Reuillard works with images, whether photographic, videographic or cinematic. She holds a bachelor’s degree in cinema and a master’s degree in visual and media arts from the Université du Québec à Montréal. Her work has been shown at the Galerie de l’UQAM, the gallery Les Territoires and at Centre VU. Several films on which she has worked as director of photography have travelled to numerous festivals.

 

 

Site web : lenamillreuillard.com

Elbow Room Residency

Elbow Room Residency

Jennie Williams was born and raised in Labrador in the most southern Inuit region in the circumpolar Arctic. She photographs people in their everyday environments and circumstances, working to document practices and traditions in the manner that they are celebrated today in Labrador. Recent bodies of work reveal her deep interest and love for Inuit cultural traditions, especially the photographic series Nalujuk Night, shot in Nain where she lives. At a summer residency at The Rooms, Williams will develop a new portrait series of urban Inuit living in St. John’s.

The exhibition is part of the Elbow Room Residency Series

Jennie Williams, Nalujuk, photograph,2015.  Courtesy of the artist

 

LOST IDYLL

LOST IDYLL

Digital video, 11:55, looped

Alternately one or two images projected side by side, this video installation shows a woman transporting a cumbersome scaffolding through various spacious landscapes and an autumnal forest. Entering the field of one projection and going out of the other, this woman makes a Sisyphean movement, repeating from a place to another in a continuous mobility.

Ephemeral structures composing our urban landscape, the scaffolding characterize the spectacle of the everyday life and is a common figure of our collective imaginary. By pulling this structure with the strength of her arms, this woman, whom no detail distinguishes, mediates the relationship that every individual maintains with a coercive environment. Her solitude, in the context of this uncultivated space from the field and the forest, sends back to the difficulty collectively felt by all to project in the future, by definition indefinite.

Jessica Arseneau, born in 1988 in Bathurst, New Brunswick, is a multidisciplinary artist currently living in Leipzig, Germany. She received her B.A. from the Université de Moncton (2011) and was a member of the cooperative artist studio Atelier King Kong from 2013 to 2015 (Montreal). Public presentations of her work occurred at art spaces such as Darling Foundry in Montreal, BronxArtSpace in New York, Galerie Sans Nom in Moncton, and Janaklees for Visual Arts in Alexandria. Recently, her work has been shown at Traverse Vidéo in Toulouse, HGB Gallery and Gallery Bipolar both in Leipzig.

Her work embodies reflections on various aspects of mobility, precariousness and the collective imaginary. Within performance, installation and digital media, her work takes the form of poetic gesture.

 

 

The Splits

The Splits

A major new video work by the Vancouver-based artist explores the practiced rhythms of everyday motions in a montage of documentary and narrative.

Cutline: Allison Hrabluik, video still from The Splits, 2015, digital video, 15:00. Image courtesy of the artist.

Now Have A Look At This Machine

Now Have A Look At This Machine

Organized and circulated by the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal With the support of the Government of Canada through its Department of Canadian Heritage Museums Assistance Program

The exhibition consists of an installation version of the hour-long creative documentary Hotel Machine that was filmed by Emanuel Licha in five cities—Beirut, Sarajevo, Gaza, Kyiv and Belgrade—in five hotels that house war correspondents covering conflicts. The film is presented in one central projection space surrounded by five adjacent archive stations, which through texts, images and documents define aspects of the concept of the “war hotel.”

Emanuel Licha, Hotel Machine (film still), 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Les Contes Modernes

 

 

The Colville Gallery

The Colville Gallery

A permanent exhibition space devoted to the work of Alex Colville (1920-2013), one of Canada’s most celebrated artists and one of Mount Allison University’s best known graduates. The Gallery features the installation of the mural Athletes, commissioned by Mount Allison for its new Athletic Centre in 1961. Designed around the theme of the student athlete, the mural was the focal point of the new building; it remained there for over 50 years, until its present installation in the stable and secure environment of Owens Art Gallery. Other artworks by Colville are also on view, including many of the preparatory drawings for Athletes and examples of the artist’s serigraphs.

Alex Colville, Athletes, oil and synthetic resin on board, 1961.

More Exhibition Listings »

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