The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2014

The Community Issue: On newsstands September 15

Hangama Amiri’s love of place

Mathieu Leger’s cultural detritus

Artist Pages by Jerry Ropson

Oh, Canada’s exploration of nationalism

 

Constructing home: Pam Hall's "Housework(s)"

Constructing home: Pam Hall’s “Housework(s)”

A house, whether it is built of bricks, stones, clay or paper, is always more than the materials that make it. In her recent exhibition Housework(s) (at The Rooms gallery in St. John’s.), Pam Hall explores the essence...
Q & A: Visual Arts News Featured Fall artist

Q & A: Visual Arts News Featured Fall artist

A maker of stories and collector curious things, Jerry Ropson strings together tiny histories that explore the ties between people, place and identity. We feature Ropson's work in our fall issue of the magazine.
Framing nature

Framing nature

Like snapshots of ephemeral performances and land art pieces, or installation shots which end up being re-presented in their own installative environments, Greenshaw captures in her work exemplary paradoxes.
The marks left behind

The marks left behind

For more than 20 years, Denise Hawrysio has continuously pushed the boundaries of printmaking, shifting traditional printmaking techniques into the realm of contemporary art while reflecting modern realities. Hawrysio removes the walls between her studio and the outside...
Exhibition Listings
Dara Birnbaum

Dara Birnbaum

Technology/ Transformation: Wonder Woman (‘78-‘79)

Kiss the Girls and Make them Cry (1979)

Installation and video artist Dara Birnbaum returns to NSCAD University after almost 35 years to exhibit two video works that were produced, in part, at NSCAD; Technology/ Transformation: Wonder Woman (‘78-‘79) and Kiss the Girls and Make them Cry (‘79). Birnbaum’s provocative video works are among the most influential and innovative contributions to the contemporary discourse on art and television. In her videotapes and multi-media installations, Birnbaum applies low-end and high-end video technology to subvert, critique or deconstruct the power of mass media images and gestures to define mythologies of culture, history and memory. Through a dynamic televisual language of images, music and text, she exposes the media’s embedded ideological meanings and posits video as a means of giving voice to the individual. Her work also has been concerned with the role of women, and attempts to find a new voice (or questioning the voice) assigned to women historically.

Camp Fires

Camp Fires

Camp Fires reveals the concept of “Camp” in the work of three important Francophone Canadian ceramic artists: Léopold L. Foulem, Paul Mathieu and Richard Milette. Camp Fires is an often sensual encounter of these artists’ powerful body of work, one that addresses subversive ideas about queer identity through clay.

1) Camp Fires Leop#4DFB473

Mary Pratt

Mary Pratt

Members Only Week: October 3-10, 2014
Members’ opening: Saturday, October 4, 2014, 2 p.m.
General Admission: October 11 – February 25, 2015

Mary Pratt brings a sharply focused, contemporary lens to deceptively simple subject matter, demonstrating sophisticated skill rooted firmly in the history of painting. Nuances of tone, composition and choice of perspective leave the viewers of Pratt’s images with a sense of wonder and, sometimes, unease. Pratt’s work reveals the breadth of emotion, technique and maturity brought to her practice.

This exhibition presents Mary Pratt in a new light, offering visitors a rare opportunity to view the range, subtlety and power of this much-celebrated artist’s oil paintings and mixed media artworks. It considers her career’s work as a conversation of themes. Artworks from the past five decades are assembled, highlighting the diversity of her subject matter, from the political to the domestic. These substantial paintings have multiple meanings for the artist and the viewer. They are paintings that surprise us, and help us to look at our own world with greater sensitivity.

The exhibition has seen significant success in each venue of its national tour. It has broken attendance records, and events like artists’ talks have been sold out.

The touring exhibition débuted at The Rooms in May 2013, and has travelled to the Art Gallery of Windsor (Ontario), the McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Kleinburg, Ont.) and the MacKenzie Art Gallery (Regina). It is on view at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia October 11 to February 25, 2015, with an exclusive members’ week October 3-10.

The exhibition Mary Pratt is a collaboration between The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery Division and the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. It is curated by Sarah Fillmore, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, and Mireille Eagan and Caroline Stone, The Rooms.

About Mary Pratt
Since her first solo exhibition at the Memorial University Art Gallery in St. John’s in 1967, Mary Pratt’s paintings have been exhibited in major galleries in Canada. They are works are featured in public, corporate, and private collections, including those of the National Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, The Rooms (St. John’s, NL), the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, Memorial University of Newfoundland, and Canada House in England. Mary Pratt holds nine honorary degrees, has served with non-profit boards, government committees, and cultural initiatives, and has been the subject of several books. In 1996, she was named a Companion of the Order of Canada. In 1997, she was awarded the Canadian Molson Prize from the Canada Council.

Land Lost

Land Lost

Land Lost is a solo exhibition that attempts a modest lineage of Christie’s art practice: from experimental film, to performance, through to photography and installation. The exhibit will look at the influence of spectacle and performance found in Christie’s work, the implications of nature in the artist’s films, and the personal sometimes self-deprecating world of DIY technology. Here, Land Lost means to negotiate between one’s own site-specific state and the non-narrative space of memory and the mind.

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Emily Falencki

Emily Falencki

New York-born Nova Scotia-based painter Emily Falencki mines the ground between traditional portraiture and anonymous representation. Falencki’s memorial portraits of missing persons give voice to grief and question society’s all-too-hard shell. She finds her source material in newspapers, on the internet or on posters around her neighborhood. The images are so often repeated they can become invisible to those who would see them. Using traditional (read “time-consuming”) painting techniques including layers of rabbit skin glue and hand sanding, Falencki commits to giving meaning to those faces, painting their likeness, and demanding attention for those lost close and far from home.

Recently, Emily Falencki has been working with text, vestiges of family correspondence and images that plumb the depth of personal and anonymous relationships. This exhibition marks her first solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

Artist/Curator Talk, June 19, 7pm
Join artist Emily Falencki and curator Sarah Fillmore for a discussion of the artist’s work.
Oh, Canada

Oh, Canada

A landmark exhibition of more than 100 works by over 60 Canadian artists, organized by the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art and curated by Denise Markonish. This large exhibition will be presented in a collaborative, multi-venue format at the Owens Art Gallery, Mount Allison University; the Confederation Centre Art Gallery; the Louise-et-Reuben-Cohen Art Gallery at Université de Moncton; and Galerie Sans Nom, Moncton. Sponsored by TD Bank Group with funding from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Province of New Brunswick.

My Favourite Things

My Favourite Things

Featuring work by five of Atlantic Canada’s female realism artists: Ann Balch, Joanne Hunt, Susan Paterson, Cathy Ross, Jessie Babin.

Joanne Hunt, Sunday Evening, oil on board, 24 x 20 in

Susan Paterson, Feathers and Eggshells (could be changed), oil on masonite, 11 x 18.625 in.

Cathy Ross, Eggs with China Fragments, watercolour, 8 x 7 in.

Ann Balch, Crowning Glory, watercolour with archival acrylic varnish, 26.75 x 20 in

The Spirit of the Caribou

The Spirit of the Caribou

The Spirit of the Caribou – The caribou has fed our bodies, souls and imagination for generations. In the Craft Council’s Main Gallery from September 6 – October 4, fourteen artists explore this rich cultural icon. Strong, graceful, resilient and threatened, the caribou is inextricably linked to the people of the North and rich in symbolism for Newfoundland and Labrador.

This group exhibition examines the caribou, a haunting animal that has sustained generations of Innu, symbolized strength for soldiers of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and inspired numerous artists across northern lands. Migratory, enduring – yet fragile – the caribou is a potent paradox for our time and culture. Shirley Moorhouse’s paintings reflect her concerns for Labrador caribou “Years ago I read an Inuit legend that explained where the vast caribou herds of Labrador once originated. Many years later I went on a caribou hunt in the Mealy Mountain foothills. Those once vast herds have disappeared.”

The Gallery was drawn to the theme of the Caribou because of its resonance with a multiplicity of communities and cultures.  It is a potent metaphor for settler, aboriginal and contemporary artists interested in the relationship of people to land and nature in the past, present and future. Exhibitor Susan Furneaux reflects on her deep connection to the barrens of Newfoundland “ Caribou are ethereal creatures; a glimpse is always magical”.

The caribou is also the emblem of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment.  Five bronze caribou memorials symbolize our soldiers’ spirit and determination.  It is a significant symbol as the province begins its 100 year commemorative activities honouring the sacrifices made by Newfoundlanders and Labradorians in World War I.

This exhibition is curated by Gallery director Sharon LeRiche and independent curator and writer Gloria Hickey. Hickey writes in her essay, “When the Craft Council Gallery put out the call for The Spirit of the Caribou it was clear that a nerve was touched. It had a direct resonance with craftspeople and artists of many communities and interests: historical and military, ecological and environmental and let’s not forget pure childhood fantasy. The caribou has fed our bodies, souls and imagination for generations.”

 

Digital Beasts

Digital Beasts

St. John’s street artist, installation artist and painter Kyle Bustin explores the monstrous figures of the digital world – the trolls and lurkers that we encounter (and often embody). This exhibition presents a new body of work created as part of the Elbow Room Residency Series.

(official denial) trade value in progress

(official denial) trade value in progress

(official denial) trade value in progress is an initiative that enacts exchange and elicits dialogue about contemporary conditions of settler colonialism and processes of decolonization and reconciliation in Canada. The project is carried out in recognition of the imperative for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people to be involved in these processes. This four-part project includes a public artist-curator talk, an information workshop, sewing actions, and an exhibition of a textile-based work. The textile piece is made up of a composite of Hudson Bay blankets with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s June 2008 ‘Statement of Apology to former students of Indian Residential Schools’ machine sewn at the center. This statement acts as the platform for response and dialogue activated in collaboration with gallery visitors.

 

Oh, Canada - Contemporary Art from North North America

Oh, Canada – Contemporary Art from North North America

Curated by Denise Markonish of the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, Oh, Canada, the acclaimed landmark survey of Canadian contemporary art is coming to venues across the Maritimes, including the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Galerie d’art Louise-et-Reuben-Cohen, Galerie Sans Nom, and Owens Art Gallery.

 

Capture 2014: Nova Scotian Realism

Capture 2014: Nova Scotian Realism

Featuring the work of 28 painters from across Nova Scotia, Capture 2014: Nova Scotian Realism seeks to dispel common assumptions about the nature of Realist art by presenting work by artists who are pushing its boundaries. Above all, the exhibition questions received notions of the status and place of Realism in the contexts of current art practices and contemporary society. Curated by Tom Smart & Peter Dykhuis. Organized and circulated by Dalhousie Art Gallery.

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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