The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2016

RILLA MARSHALL

JESSE JACOBS

RAY FENWICK

TONIA DI RISIO

Tracing the gestures: Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard find everyday wonder on the Magdalen Islands

Tracing the gestures: Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard find everyday wonder on the Magdalen Islands

Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard were to deny the Google Maps or other formal ways of mapping the area and seek the unwritten in the unexpected.
Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

In an art world unbeholden to market forces, what’s the correlation between the jurors of funding councils and awards to who they render visible and the image of Canadian that presents to the rest of the world?
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Natural Elements

Natural Elements

This new work continues the artist’s exploration of the use of fluid inks on the slick surface of Yupo and the velvety surface of Mylar. The organic shapes and patterns that emerge in these non-objective paintings become suggestive of the elemental forms of the natural world.

elements-28

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Borrowing heavily from the language of wine, this 3-part exhibition strategy proposes to look at regional artistic production through the cultural milieu from which it emerges.  Terroir is defined as “the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.” Terroir is a survey of the AGNS permanent collection with a special focus on Nova Scotia roots — the history and culture of place informing its artistic community’s output. This exhibition tours the province exploring the flavour and makeup of the work collected over the AGNS’ history.

Image credit: Jones Bannerman, Frances M, Still Life with Lobster (detail), c.1883, Oil on canvas, 51.5 x 65.0 cm. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 1933.4

 

Dialogues

Dialogues

Recent acquisitions by Allan Harding MacKay, Jinny Yu, and others are positioned in dialogue with existing collection works.

Cutline: Jinny Yu, Tiepolo Project, (detail),  2010, oil on aluminum, 163.8 x 1341.1 cm.  Gift of the artist, 2011

 

Home Economics

Home Economics

Highlighting how craft and commerce have been deeply entwined, Home Economics sheds light on two centuries of creation that embraces vernacular design and individual expression – vibrant evidence of Canada’s evolving cultural and economic landscape.  Today, artists and artisans continue to adapt personal experiences and points of view into material culture, part of the new ethos of interdisciplinary creativity in the 21st century.

The exhibition presents over 100 hooked rugs from the TMC collection, including the work of contemporary artists Joanna Close, Nancy Edell, Hannah Epstein, Deanne Fitzpatrick, Heather Goodchild, Barbara Klunder and Yvonne Mullock as well as seldom-seen pieces by Emily Carr, Clarence Gagnon, Florence Ryder and Georges-Édouard Tremblay.

IMAGE:Nancy Edell, Peter and Nancy as the Two-headed Dog, Various yarns, burlap, hooked, 1999.

photo credit: Steve Farmer

Anna Hawkins

Anna Hawkins

Hawkins holds a BA in Art History from the University of Pittsburgh and an MFA from Concordia University. Working primarily with video, her work is concerned with the ways that images, gestures and information are transmitted and transformed online. Hawkins will exhibit a body of work that employs examples from art history and contemporary internet culture as a framework through which to sift, collect, and collage online-sourced and original images. Using recognizable forms, these pieces attempt to organize and make sense of the boundless amount of visual imagery available online.

 

Snapshots of Armageddon:  Jack Turner and the Great War

Snapshots of Armageddon: Jack Turner and the Great War

A gunner from O’Leary, PEI, Turner’s photographs capture the experience of the front lines during World War I.  Curated by Boyde Beck

Cutline: Jack Turner, Grave of Boyd Carpenter 1916, Somme Front, c. 1976,  hand-coloured photograph mounted on composition board, 58.7 x 50.5 cm, Collection of Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CAG 80.2.7)

Double Take

Double Take

A routine glance at a work of art sometimes leads to a double take—a delayed reaction to a surprising detail after the initial failure to notice anything unusual.   Selected from the permanent collection, the works in Double Take either are ‘assisted readymades’ (modified found objects) or, as ‘replicas,’ they resemble assisted readymades.  The second or third glance generally prompts second thoughts.

In combination, the painting/assemblage by Gerald Ferguson and sculptural objects by Marc Courtemanche and Kelly Mark bring art objects into problematic relationships with concepts of authenticity, categories of taste, and hierarchies of practice.

Silhouettes and Other Shadows

Silhouettes and Other Shadows

This exhibition presents a selection of works from the Owens’ collection which features silhouettes, shadows and prominent contour lines. Cut paper silhouettes were originally used as an affordable method to capture a person’s likeness in the eighteenth century and remain a popular trope in advertising today. The works in this exhibition use silhouettes to go beyond traditional portraiture, incorporating a variety of media including but not limited to painted china, silkscreen and film.

Susan Schelle, Calendar, porcelain plates, gold leaf, silkscreen, 1994. Photo credit: Owens Art Gallery

Glimpses of Eden

Glimpses of Eden

William Allderdice began painting when he retired as a professor of geography, studying under artists such as Gerald Squires, Tara Bryan, and Kathleen Knowling. Over the past two decades, he has created a prolific body of paintings and drawings that document memories from throughout his life, ranging from his early adventures (and mishaps) as a cowboy to his current life in The Battery neighbourhood of St. John’s.

Hazel Eckert

Hazel Eckert

Eastern Edge Rogue Gallery
A series of collages that explore the relationship between disparate elements and the point where they come together within a composition. Carefully chosen as graphic elements, favored for their abstract properties instead of their overt cultural reference, these non-representational works interpret the tension between fragmented narratives. The seam formed by a binding represents a margin of space that either joins or separates, enveloping the eye or giving it pause. By way of intuition and chance encounters within the collage process itself, Eckert endows found materials with an intended design and sense of purpose.
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About Three Years Ago

About Three Years Ago

The Side Gallery features fellow NSCAD alumnus Daniel Hutchinson, now based in Hamilton. His painting practice explores what makes a painting count as a “painting,” while emphasizing the primacy of perceptual experience. This solo exhibition presents new work along with a selection of paintings from the past few years, showing the development of his ideas and methods. Many appear at first entirely black, yet are replete with glistening light, formed by reflections captured through striated brushstrokes. The moving spectator perceives new conditions at every spatial location.

Force of Nature

Force of Nature

Ania Biczysko works principally in two media – large steel sculpture and oil paint on plexiglass. The connection between these very different media is her interest in the interpretation of natural phenomena. Ania’s solo and collaborative pieces are in collections in both North America and Europe. She obtained her MFA from the Academy of Fine Arts in Gdansk (Poland). She has exhibited, coordinated and curated many exhibitions over the past 25 years.

IMAGE : Ania Biczysko, Force of Nature ,1 reverse oil painting on plexi, 2015. photo credit: Ania Biczysko

 

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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