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Current Issue: Spring 2017

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RACHEL BEACH
GRAEME PATTERSON
RITA MCKEOUGH + MORE

Looking back: Our version of "women in the arts" in the 70's

Looking back: Our version of “women in the arts” in the 70’s

The 70's art world "was a desert for women! Let alone any person of colour!” But in 1977, in the second issue of Visual Arts News, we published a list of publications focusing on "women in the arts."...
Call for Artist Pages

Call for Artist Pages

Visual Arts News invites all Atlantic Canadian print media/paper-based artists to create new works for our Special 40th Anniversary Edition of the magazine. The bonus issue is scheduled to be released in December 2017. We will commission up...
Holding space with Rachel Beach

Holding space with Rachel Beach

That these pieces “live” as they do is overwhelmingly apparent in Mid-Sentence; they exist in conversation with each other across distance and time, a living interaction, and they evoke a sense beyond the physically sculptural, beyond image, to...
Walking With Our Sisters pays homage to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Walking With Our Sisters pays homage to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Community members commemorate each individual life lost: "They are sisters, mothers, aunties, daughters, cousins, grandmothers, wives and partners. They have been cared for, they have been loved, they are missing and they are not forgotten."
Mocean Dance animates its past in lightening speed

Mocean Dance animates its past in lightening speed

At fifteen years, the 2016 Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia Masterworks Arts Award winner Mocean Dance is one of the longest surviving contemporary dance companies in Atlantic Canada and well-known for its highly physical, collaborative work.
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Corpus Melliferous

Corpus Melliferous

Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 1, 7pm-9pm

Mi’kmaq Word of The Day 2.0

Mi’kmaq Word of The Day 2.0

A re-visitation of a previous project from 2010, where Bennett was in residence at Plug-In Institute of Contemporary Art in Winnipeg and he received Mi’kmaq language lessons via instant messaging from Johnson. This new work will be presented in the digital format of an audioscape and a daily drawing of text sent by the artists to Eastern Edge Gallery, the growth of this exhibition will echo the organic nature of the relationship between land, language and sustenance. The artists would like to invite the residents of St. John’s, Ktamkuk to witness the growth of the installation while learning the Mi’kmaw language, in exchange for a donation of a non-perishable food item to the exhibition for the St. John’s Native Friendship Centre.

Ursula Johnson is an emerging performance and installation artist of Mi’kmaw First Nation ancestry. She graduated from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design and has participated in over 30 group shows and 5 solo exhibitions. Her performances are often place-based and employ cooperative didactic intervention.

Jordan Bennett is a multi-disciplinary visual artist of  Mi’kmaq ancestry from Stephenville Crossing Ktaqmkuk (Newfoundland). Jordan holds a BFA from Sir Wilfred Grenfell College and a MFA from University of British Columbia Okanagan. He has shown extensively nationally and internationally, in venues such as The Museum of Art and Design, NYC; Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe, NM; Campbelltown Art Centre, Campbelltown, AUS, and was one of two artists to represent Newfoundland and Labrador at the 2015 Venice Biennial at Galleria Ca’Rezzonico, Venice, Italy.

Jordan’s ongoing body of work utilizes various mediums to explore land, language, the act of visiting, familial histories and challenging colonial perceptions of indigenous histories, stereotypes and presence with a particular focus on exploring Mi’kmaq and Beothuk visual culture of Ktaqmkuk (Newfoundland).

Glossy

Glossy

Gallery 2B
Artist presentation: Thurs 9 March, 12 Noon

Jaroma challenges what she observes as “our destructive pattern of quick, mass consumption” in her large abstract paintings. She emulates the alluring colours and patterns that often coat the mass produced, plastic products that are consumed in “increasingly quick bursts of euphoria akin to sugar highs”.

Photomatic Travelling Tintype Studio

Photomatic Travelling Tintype Studio

Opening Reception: Friday, February 3rd, 2017 | 6:00PM – 8:00PM

Many visitors to last year’s Lumière Arts Festival will remember Karen Stentaford’s travelling tintype studio, which was located in downtown Sydney at the top of Charlotte Street. The Sackville-based photographer spent the evening making portraits using the 19th century tintype technique and made pictures of dozens of visitors using the now-rare photographic process. The results of this work will be on display at the CBU Art Gallery in conjunction with the ‘Proletariart’ community art exhibition.

Karen Stentaford is an artist and educator who works primarily in medium and large format photography, often employing toy cameras and alternative processes. Since 2012, much of her work has been made using the wet plate collodion process—glass negatives and tintypes. Her recent bodies of work investigate ideas of place and memory influenced by the Newfoundland landscape of her childhood. Karen is the photography technician and lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts at Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB.

Inuit Fine Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut

Inuit Fine Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut

SakKijâjuk – a Labrador Inuit term meaning, “to be visible” – highlights the little known craft and artworks produced in Nunatsiavut (the Inuit region of Labrador) over half a century of exciting, diverse production. The exhibition features the work of dozens of artists in photography, sculpture, painting, clothing, drawing, printmaking, basketry, film, video, and the textile arts. The exhibition opens at The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery before touring across Canada.

Michelle Baikie, The Hunter, 1998, 35.56 x 25.4cm, digital photograph, Collection of the artist

Industrious

Industrious

Gallery 3
Artist presentation: Wed 29 March, 12 Noon

Industrious is a multimedia installation prompted by detritus collected from sites of industrial ruin on Cape Breton Island. Arsenault presents collected, restored, replicated and archived industrial artefacts alongside maps, narratives, and other research materials related to place in order to question the ways in which the stories we choose to tell, and call history, are relayed.

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away

Opening Reception: Friday October 7, 2016 4:00-6:00PM

Shaping the Shore, From Here and Away is an exhibition that commemorates 2016 as the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Canada. Women first earned the right to vote in Canada in 1916 but it was not until 1960 that all Canadian women, regardless of ethnicity or Indigenous status were eligible to fully participate in the political process.

Featuring artwork by over 15 women artists from the Cape Breton University Art Gallery’s collection and three new works by contemporary Canadian artists, Kinuk (Dartmouth, NS) comprised of Ursula Johnson and Angella Parsons, Diane Borsato (Toronto, ON) and Anne Morrell Robinson (Margaree Valley, NS) in collaboration with the Ocean Waves Quilt Society (Cape Breton Island, NS), and D’Arcy Wilson (Halifax, NS) who completed an artist residency at CBU Art Gallery in July 2016.

The artists presented in this exhibition have unique connections to Cape Breton, whether they were born and raised, lived and worked, or visitors to the region with lasting impressions, these women have shaped and been shaped by the island, its people and the dynamic landscape.

Image: Lindee Climo, Lady of Gustavia, 1978.

Golden Moons

Golden Moons

Naturally Dyed & Handwoven, each moon piece is bisected horizontally between sky and ground or water, and collectively they ask questions about location, space, scale, concreteness, control. As we speed up in all our interactions, the slow, incremental woven, dyed progress of these pieces seems satisfying and rich, and possessing of serenity.

Frances Dorsey, Black Moon, handwoven and naturally dyed fibres,2015. photo credit: image courtesy of the artist

Frances Dorsey and Rachel Morouney, Black Moon and Crenellated Fan,handwoven and naturally dyed fibres, carved and glazed ceramic, 2015. photo credit: images courtesy of the artists

 

Matuitine to Mesonoxian

Matuitine to Mesonoxian

Gallery 2B

Curator Erica Flake offers, “Matutine refers to the early morning, before the sun, and before dawn. Conversely, Mesonoxian pertains to the dead of night; the midnight hours. Through digital and analogue mediums, five photographic artists explore the meaning of these words within the concept of liminality: the ambiguous state occurring when a transformation begins but is not complete. By manipulating light and shadow, the Photo Gang Collective have produced works embodying the notion of the ‘in-between’.”

La femme dans la Lune / Her Head in the Clouds

La femme dans la Lune / Her Head in the Clouds

Catherine Bolduc’s new work creates a fantastical space that blends the figure of Christopher Columbus with the strange, rocky, moon-like terrain found on parts of the west coast of Newfoundland. This immersive contemporary art installation constructs a new reality through video, collage, and large-scale drawings in ink and watercolour. Bolduc uses the language of fiction, maps, archival documents, and travel journals to re-imagine an extraordinary place. This work draws on a six-week 2015 artist residency at Gros Morne National Park, offered in partnership by The Rooms and Parks Canada.

Catherine Bolduc, La Femme dans la lune / Her head in the clouds (detail), Mixed media, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

The Sensual World

The Sensual World

Opening Reception: Friday 3 March, 7:00 pm

Owens Art Gallery, Mount Allison University

The Owens Art Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibit, The Sensual World, on Friday 3 March 2017 at 7:00 pm.

The Sensual World is an exhibition of works by five contemporary Canadian artists working in and around comics. The artists are Marc Bell, Elisabeth Belliveau, Jessica Campbell, Julie Doucet and Eli Howey. While all related to comics, the works in The Sensual World span a wide array of mediums and sizes, and include textiles, print, collage and animation.

The Sensual World is curated by Patrick Allaby, Owens Art Gallery Intern for the 2016-17 academic year. The exhibition will remain on view until 2 April.

The opening of The Sensual World will be followed by the closing reception of Start Gallery’s February Exhibitions from 8:30 to 10:00 pm and an after-party for both Owens and Start events at Thunder & Lightning beginning at 10:00 pm.

Cold Nights

Cold Nights

in the rOGUE: Cold Nights is a collection of illustrative portraits of varying media. The work is embedded with imagery representative of my hometown in Labrador and the east coast of Newfoundland—through botany, wild animals and landscapes. The portraits are illustrative in style and express my interest in storytelling, design and painting. Each piece of Cold Nights is its own experiment in color, narrative and illustrative style. Collected over a few years, the creation of Cold Nights was a slow and therapeutic process. Over that time, I navigated through the waters of being a post-BFA artist to becoming a full-time student again while also trying to continue my artistic practice. The resulting work is a collection of smaller travel-friendly pieces, in media ranging from sketchbook pages to digital paintings.

Sam Moss is an ex-Haligonian born in Labrador City, and currently living in St. John’s. She graduated with a BFA from NSCAD University in 2014, and is currently studying Computer Engineering at Memorial University. When not debugging code, she likes to draw/make/destroy things.

More Exhibition Listings »

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