The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: Spring 2016

LEAH MODIGLIANI

PAUL ÉDOUARD BOURQUE

THIERRY DELVA

COCO GUZMAN

 

Going there: The playful pain of Neil LaPierre

Going there: The playful pain of Neil LaPierre

Delving into the personal and surreal, Neil LaPierre is committed to bringing the HA-HA’s into art discourse.
Liberated Form

Liberated Form

Richard Mueller is not so interested in coherent pictorial space or literal depiction as in the potential of formal arrangements to engender associative and emotional responses “independent of literal language.”
Echoes across time and space

Echoes across time and space

L’Acadie Mythique, a travelling exhibition that recently visited the Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery, is curated by Harlan Johnson and features nearly twenty different artists from across the Acadian diaspora.
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Secret Citadel

Secret Citadel

Rachel Beach

Rachel Beach

NSCAD grad Rachel Beach returns to Halifax from New York, bringing her painted sculptures—or sculptural paintings—to the main space at Saint Marys’ University Art Gallery. Beach’s freestanding painted wooden sculptures, made up of balanced geometric forms, play with form and volume, positive and negative space, mass and void. A series of platforms on the floor each present a sculpture or a group of sculptures, while wall pieces mirror this strategy, with one large piece, or several smaller ones, grouped within an allotted square.

 

A Day in the Life Of

A Day in the Life Of

In A Day in the Life Of, private moments are remembered and experienced, opening the door to a re-consideration of how the passage of time is expressed. Working through the medium of installation, White captures the passing of a day through a new series of watercolours, drawings and texts, paired with small-screen video animations. The work raises questions about the ‘ordinary’ and especially about what happens when seemingly nothing is happening. By elevating the everyday, White makes us see, not only time passing, but the intrinsic beauty of things that is revealed when looking closely.

 

Parallel Journey: Works on Paper (1975-2015)

Parallel Journey: Works on Paper (1975-2015)

 

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Free Play

Free Play

As Situationist International member Guy Debord once wrote:  “No vital periods ever began from a theory. What’s first is a game, a struggle, a journey.”

Free Play is a contemporary art exhibition that presents the work of artists who borrow from play and games to reveal different social, philosophical and ethical questions. The audience is invited to play with a wide array of artworks by renowned international artists: Cory Arcangel, Ryan Gander, Jeanne van Heeswijk and Rolf Engelen, Pedro Reyes, David Shrigley, Yoko Ono, Ruth Catlow, Mary Flanagan, Futurefarmers, Allan McCollum and Matt Mullican, Paul Noble, Erik Svedäng, Jason Rohrer, Patrick Bernier and Olive Martin. The Rooms is featuring a local component to the exhibition by St. John’s-based artist, Joe Fowler.

Free Play is an exhibition curated by Melissa E. Feldman and organized and produced by Independent Curators International (ICI), New York. Free Play was made possible, in part, by grants from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation and the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, and with the generous support from ICI’s International Forum and Board of Trustees.

 

Hazel Eckert

Hazel Eckert

Eastern Edge Rogue Gallery
A series of collages that explore the relationship between disparate elements and the point where they come together within a composition. Carefully chosen as graphic elements, favored for their abstract properties instead of their overt cultural reference, these non-representational works interpret the tension between fragmented narratives. The seam formed by a binding represents a margin of space that either joins or separates, enveloping the eye or giving it pause. By way of intuition and chance encounters within the collage process itself, Eckert endows found materials with an intended design and sense of purpose.
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Enter the Fog

Enter the Fog

The exhibition “Enter the Fog” brings together works by Maya Beaudry, Julia Feyrer, Tamara Henderson and Tiziana La Melia, who embrace personal narrative and intuition as guiding forces in their creative practices. These artists view art as a process rather than as a product; they arrange highly codified and intimate objects to create multi-referential and multi-sensory installations. Using a variety of strategies, they attempt to express the subconscious and reveal the psyche, continually trusting their instincts to transform what might appear as bizarre and fragmented juxtapositions into allegories, screenplays or poems about everyday life. The exhibition will be an immersive and interactive environment, as existing works will be re-interpreted and combined with newly-created, site-specific installations.

Julia Feyrer & Tamara Henderson, Old Hag Bottle, Valerian Tincture, mold blown glass, cork, 2013.  Image courtesy of The Banff Centre. Photo: Rita Taylor, The Banff Centre

 

About Three Years Ago

About Three Years Ago

The Side Gallery features fellow NSCAD alumnus Daniel Hutchinson, now based in Hamilton. His painting practice explores what makes a painting count as a “painting,” while emphasizing the primacy of perceptual experience. This solo exhibition presents new work along with a selection of paintings from the past few years, showing the development of his ideas and methods. Many appear at first entirely black, yet are replete with glistening light, formed by reflections captured through striated brushstrokes. The moving spectator perceives new conditions at every spatial location.

MIRROR / MOTHER (fragments)

MIRROR / MOTHER (fragments)

Santos’ interest lies in transformation, as she reflects on fleeting childhood memories and her family’s immigration to Canada as an autobiographical point of departure. Experiences as history, fragmented into memory, and re-told to become personal myth are negotiated through the act of drawing, one that operates in narrative, and in fiction. This is the realm of play where Santos situates her work.

1. asuang (big sister)

Dialogues

Dialogues

Recent acquisitions by Allan Harding MacKay, Jinny Yu, and others are positioned in dialogue with existing collection works.

Cutline: Jinny Yu, Tiepolo Project, (detail),  2010, oil on aluminum, 163.8 x 1341.1 cm.  Gift of the artist, 2011

 

Weaving the Existing

Weaving the Existing

OPENING & ARTIST’S TALK Wednesday 23 March at 7pm

Born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Giorgia Volpe has since 1998 lived in Quebec City, where she has taught drawing, printmaking and photogram at Méduse. This first survey of the artist’s career encompasses performance, action art, drawing, sculpture, photography, installations and video.

Volpe often relies on weaving, a technique that runs through her entire oeuvre. Fibres—paper, plastic, recycled material, textiles—are used to create works in which the material, traces of text and other motifs nuance the meaning. Because Volpe completes few “finished” works, her art is often shown in a temporary state, awaiting further transformations. This exhibition represents the suspension in time of her process.

 

The Path We Share

The Path We Share

Four First Nations artists have come together to take part in two creative residencies in Nova Scotia—one at The Deanery Project in Lower Ship Harbour in 2014, the other on Brier Island in 2015. The basis of this collaborative exchange is centered on reconciling the parallel journeys of the Mi’kmaq People and the whales of the North Atlantic. Through a self-directed framework of dialogue and artmaking, The Path We Share examines shared stories of contact and consequence to arrive at newfound forms of expression and understanding.

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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