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Current Issue: Spring 2017

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RACHEL BEACH
GRAEME PATTERSON
RITA MCKEOUGH + MORE

Call for Artist Pages

Call for Artist Pages

Visual Arts News invites all Atlantic Canadian print media/paper-based artists to create new works for our Special 40th Anniversary Edition of the magazine. The bonus issue is scheduled to be released in December 2017. We will commission up...
Holding space with Rachel Beach

Holding space with Rachel Beach

That these pieces “live” as they do is overwhelmingly apparent in Mid-Sentence; they exist in conversation with each other across distance and time, a living interaction, and they evoke a sense beyond the physically sculptural, beyond image, to...
Walking With Our Sisters pays homage to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Walking With Our Sisters pays homage to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Community members commemorate each individual life lost: "They are sisters, mothers, aunties, daughters, cousins, grandmothers, wives and partners. They have been cared for, they have been loved, they are missing and they are not forgotten."
Mocean Dance animates its past in lightening speed

Mocean Dance animates its past in lightening speed

At fifteen years, the 2016 Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia Masterworks Arts Award winner Mocean Dance is one of the longest surviving contemporary dance companies in Atlantic Canada and well-known for its highly physical, collaborative work.
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Photomatic Travelling Tintype Studio

Photomatic Travelling Tintype Studio

Opening Reception: Friday, February 3rd, 2017 | 6:00PM – 8:00PM

Many visitors to last year’s Lumière Arts Festival will remember Karen Stentaford’s travelling tintype studio, which was located in downtown Sydney at the top of Charlotte Street. The Sackville-based photographer spent the evening making portraits using the 19th century tintype technique and made pictures of dozens of visitors using the now-rare photographic process. The results of this work will be on display at the CBU Art Gallery in conjunction with the ‘Proletariart’ community art exhibition.

Karen Stentaford is an artist and educator who works primarily in medium and large format photography, often employing toy cameras and alternative processes. Since 2012, much of her work has been made using the wet plate collodion process—glass negatives and tintypes. Her recent bodies of work investigate ideas of place and memory influenced by the Newfoundland landscape of her childhood. Karen is the photography technician and lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts at Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB.

In Some Far Place

In Some Far Place

In 1977, a flamingo landed on the coast of Newfoundland and was immediately shot. Now preserved in the collection of The Rooms, the strange story of how this tropical bird came to be in its final resting place far from home is the starting point for this contemporary art exhibition that explores the inherent absurdity and poignancy of collecting behaviour. What motivates us to collect? How do we choose what to include and exclude from our collections and exhibitions? Artworks by local, national, and international artists are bought together with a selection of works from The Rooms Permanent Collections that have never before been exhibited. Throughout, works that incorporate song and voice elude to absence and elegy, but also to the limitless power of sound to exclaim presence, even when there is no “room” for physical inclusion. The end result is a sumptuous, poetic experience for the eyes, and ears.

David R. Harper, Learning to Love You (detail), Wood, steel, cast polymer with virgin paper pulp, photo paper, enamel, paint.2015. photo credit: Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Sara Cwynar, Soft Film, 16mm film transferred to digital video, 2016

 

The Splits

The Splits

A major new video work by the Vancouver-based artist explores the practiced rhythms of everyday motions in a montage of documentary and narrative.

Cutline: Allison Hrabluik, video still from The Splits, 2015, digital video, 15:00. Image courtesy of the artist.

Golden Moons

Golden Moons

Naturally Dyed & Handwoven, each moon piece is bisected horizontally between sky and ground or water, and collectively they ask questions about location, space, scale, concreteness, control. As we speed up in all our interactions, the slow, incremental woven, dyed progress of these pieces seems satisfying and rich, and possessing of serenity.

Frances Dorsey, Black Moon, handwoven and naturally dyed fibres,2015. photo credit: image courtesy of the artist

Frances Dorsey and Rachel Morouney, Black Moon and Crenellated Fan,handwoven and naturally dyed fibres, carved and glazed ceramic, 2015. photo credit: images courtesy of the artists

 

Putting Your Pants on One Leg at a Time

Putting Your Pants on One Leg at a Time

Gallery 3
Artist presentation: Wed 1 February, 12 Noon

Regarding her sculptural installation, Madeleine Scott offers, “An assemblage of objects reflect on language tied up in both the passage of time and the body. A few small shoes – some cast in bronze, others fired clay – stand in for the hands and face of a clock.”

Elbow Room Residency

Elbow Room Residency

Jennie Williams was born and raised in Labrador in the most southern Inuit region in the circumpolar Arctic. She photographs people in their everyday environments and circumstances, working to document practices and traditions in the manner that they are celebrated today in Labrador. Recent bodies of work reveal her deep interest and love for Inuit cultural traditions, especially the photographic series Nalujuk Night, shot in Nain where she lives. At a summer residency at The Rooms, Williams will develop a new portrait series of urban Inuit living in St. John’s.

The exhibition is part of the Elbow Room Residency Series

Jennie Williams, Nalujuk, photograph,2015.  Courtesy of the artist

 

Call and Response: Collages and Paintings

Call and Response: Collages and Paintings

Opening Reception: Wednesday, March 1, 7pm-9pm

Walking With Our Sisters

Walking With Our Sisters

The Walking With Our Sisters – K’jipuktuk / Halifax planning committee would like the community to join us for the Pjila’si / Welcoming for Walking With Our Sisters on January 14 at 2pm, located in Mount Saint Vincent University’s McCain Centre Atrium (166 Bedford Highway). This will be followed by a feast and everyone is welcome to visit the Walking With Our Sisters commemoration in the MSVU Art Gallery afterwards.  There will be volunteers on site to help direct visitors to these locations.  All are welcome.

Walking With Our Sisters is a commemoration honouring missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and Two-Spirit people through ceremony, community and reflection.  It presents more than 1800 pairs of moccasin tops (vamps) made by contributing artists. The moccasins are unfinished, symbolizing over 1180 sisters, mothers, aunties, daughters, cousins, grandmothers, wives and partners whose lives were tragically cut short over the last thirty years.  This project has been entirely crowd-sourced and supported by thousands of Indigenous and non-Indigenous women and men across Turtle Island who care deeply about this issue. All of our efforts in bringing this exhibit to life have been on a strictly voluntary basis.

Walking With Our Sisters is rooted in the four principles of love, humility, protocol and volunteerism, and is guided by local Elders and community members. As Walking With Our Sisters is experienced in ceremony, footwear is to be removed before entering the space. Women are encouraged to wear skirts if they feel comfortable doing so.  Smudging (the burning of sage) will take place inside the MSVU Art Gallery, cleansing the space for the Sisters.  There will be no photography permitted at any time.  Public figures and dignitaries are welcome to attend but there will be no public speakers.

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Borrowing heavily from the language of wine, this 3-part exhibition strategy proposes to look at regional artistic production through the cultural milieu from which it emerges.  Terroir is defined as “the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.” Terroir is a survey of the AGNS permanent collection with a special focus on Nova Scotia roots — the history and culture of place informing its artistic community’s output. This exhibition tours the province exploring the flavour and makeup of the work collected over the AGNS’ history.

Image credit: Jones Bannerman, Frances M, Still Life with Lobster (detail), c.1883, Oil on canvas, 51.5 x 65.0 cm. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 1933.4

 

SymphoNY

SymphoNY

Artist Talk: Sunday, January 15, 2pm

SymphoNY is a ViewPoint Member Solo Exhibition by Stephen Brake. SymphoNY is based on a series of images Stephen took from 2006 to 2007 while in New York City. Using a slow shutter technique on the streets of Manhattan, he created blurred images of people and things moving around the solidity of the city. Stephen has been making photographic images for over 30 years. He studied photography at NSCAD University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography. He is passionate about creating visually inspiring photographs. His expertise in light and composition guide him in capturing compelling images that tell a story and invoke a sense of place.

Now Have A Look At This Machine

Now Have A Look At This Machine

Organized and circulated by the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal With the support of the Government of Canada through its Department of Canadian Heritage Museums Assistance Program

The exhibition consists of an installation version of the hour-long creative documentary Hotel Machine that was filmed by Emanuel Licha in five cities—Beirut, Sarajevo, Gaza, Kyiv and Belgrade—in five hotels that house war correspondents covering conflicts. The film is presented in one central projection space surrounded by five adjacent archive stations, which through texts, images and documents define aspects of the concept of the “war hotel.”

Emanuel Licha, Hotel Machine (film still), 2016. Courtesy of the artist and Les Contes Modernes

 

 

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

Leisure: Narrative no. 9

During their 2016 artist residency at The Rooms, Meredith Carruthers and Susannah Wesley became fascinated by the many stories of people losing track of time and place while berry-picking and the associated folkloric narratives that attempt to explain this phenomena. Using archival images, sound, and berry-dyed fabrics, they reflect upon how perception can shift to disorientation even in the most familiar landscapes.

Leisure,  Narrative no. 9, Digital photograph, 2016

More Exhibition Listings »

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