The cover of the current issue

Current Issue:

ANNA TORMA’S IMAGINARY WORLDS

ELEANOR KINGS DARK UTOPIA

THE NEW FACES OF FOLK ART

Physical Landscapes

Physical Landscapes

  While exploring Anatomica, I experienced several moments of disorientation, unsure whether I was approaching a piece with stronger connections to an artists’ studio or a laboratory. Take the human spine curving from a steel frame in the...
Art World Antidote

Art World Antidote

Folklore And Other Panics addresses the impossibility of “alleviating anxiety around elitism” in the contemporary art world. And further, according to the exhibition’s pamphlet, “the works provide a constellation of ideas, responding in various ways to themes of...
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
A measure of disorder: Seripop's exploration of entropy

A measure of disorder: Seripop’s exploration of entropy

Though some mark 50th anniversaries with gold, Séripop’s The Face Stayed East, the Mouth Went West marks the 50th anniversary of Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre by opening with more striking elements. Interested in exploring entropy in bright colours and on...
Exhibition Listings
Touching the Sky: The Metaphysical Quest of John Clark

Touching the Sky: The Metaphysical Quest of John Clark

Touching the Sky: The Metaphysical Quest of John Clark, curated by Jeffrey Spalding, and organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, highlights the figurative painting of British-born John Clark, an artist and educator who lived and worked in both eastern and western Canada, and who passed away 25 years ago, but left an indelible mark on the cultural landscape of the country. Drawn from the Clark estate and public collections, the works in this exhibition provide an overview of the artist’s remarkable career.

A Car for All Seasons

A Car for All Seasons

Tom Forrestall: A Car for all Seasons, curated by Nick Webb, and organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, showcases the veteran realist painter’s vintage 1980 Mercedes-Benz 300 SD, albeit transformed into a highly unique work of art. The project emerged from a conversation about the artist’s car, and the concept of “a car for all seasons,” revolving around the seasons (a familiar enough subject in Forrestall’s painting) for a German car that had so admirably weathered the Canadian climate, gradually took form. Forrestall invites viewers to reconsider the status of the automobile and our relationship with them. This car continues to fulfill the primary function for which it was made, but it now carries an art identity – it is both car and painting; and a Forrestall painting at that.

This, Our Warmest Year

This, Our Warmest Year

With a specific interest in printmaking’s historic relationship to representation, Nicole’s artwork gestures to humans’ role in constructing and idealizing landscape. Her most recent installations feature series of handbound accordion books that expand to create large-scale panoramic images. Each book contains text by her collaborator, Devon Wootten, who excises language from climate change reports to craft poems. The works function as both images and texts, using the book as a site for recording and preserving ecologically fraught landscapes. Referencing 19th-century panoramas as well as the Romantic painting tradition, this work nods to a period when humans’ relationship to landscape was rapidly transformed.

 

Mostly Land

Mostly Land

Salmon’s paintings are part of a realist tradition long entrenched in Atlantic Canada, which continues to ask critical questions and to reveal the importance of observation in art.  Interestingly, realism is a difficult genre to define today as it has grown to encompass many aesthetics and styles.  Salmon’s engagement with realism challenges traditional notions of the landscape genre and analyses the reality of the landscape with precision and complexity.

A number of the works depict the rusted, broken bodies of cars as they decay on the land. Salmon is actively engaging with this subject matter. He is not simply relaying visual information to the viewer; it becomes a discussion about land, its use and concerns relating to human intervention. Undulating between more traditional landscape imagery and these images from salvage yards, Salmon creates a tension between what the viewer expects from landscape paintings and what is actually there. His work captures the beauty of the banal all the while emphasizing this question of land and its use. Preoccupation with land use is at a critical juncture on a world-wide scale, but has a particular resonance with the current economic prospects in New Brunswick.

 

 

High Tide: The Atlantic Art Collection

High Tide: The Atlantic Art Collection

High Tide: Paintings from the Atlantic Collection, as selected from the permanent collection by Gallery Director/CEO and Chief Curator Terry Graff. This exhibition offers visitors the opportunity to view a cross-section of some of the best-loved paintings from the Gallery’s extensive reservoir of Atlantic-based works, and allows each individual work to speak for itself. Presented are paintings by Mary Pratt, Tom Forrestall, Molly Lamb Bobak, Fred Ross, Miller Brittain, Jack Humphrey, Christopher Pratt, and others.

OutSideIn

OutSideIn

Produced in partnership with Coleman Lemieux and Compagnie, the video projection, OutSideIn , is a 55 min. looped stereoscopic film divided into five chapters: earth, wood, flower, stone, water. Each section explores a different elemental environment. It is a visual exploration of the continuum between the inner motions and structures of the human body and those of the natural environment. Working in 3-D allows the artist a new way of exploring her concerns with form and volume on screen and augments the visceral aspects of movement/dance. Troake’s creative approach encourages new ways of thinking about performance and movement and provides new perspectives on our relationship to the landscape. The award-winning dancers in the video are Carol Prieur and Bill Coleman and the music is by composer, John Oswald. OutSideIn has been selected to represent Newfoundland and Labrador at the 2015 Venice Biennale.

Marker Drawing Series

Marker Drawing Series

Opening Reception: Friday April 10 at 6PM

In the Marker Drawing Series, ink is drawn through layers of stacked paper, creating an image using gravity, the fibres of the paper and the chemicals in the markers. Each individual drawing is a still frame of fluid motion and time.

Good tangled up like hair in evil

Good tangled up like hair in evil

Good tangled up like hair in evil, a title taken from Clarice Lispector’s Agua Viva, is an exhibition of painted and collaged works by Sarah Cale. Continuing her exploration of subverting conventional figure ground relationships, these new paintings use discarded collage fragments to reconstruct new compositions from older works. Cale’s recent work investigates the history of transcendence in abstraction, where paintings appear as a meditation on abstraction’s history rather than a literal reenactment. Through an expressive remove, works slowly and manually construct the painterly gesture by capturing it through collage.

 

 

Collage Series

Collage Series

For The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery Division’s first interdisciplinary residency, Canadian visual artist Tanya St-Pierre produced a new body of digital collages drawing upon her extensive research carried out in The Rooms Provincial Archives. Exploring women’s work during the first and second world wars in Newfoundland and Labrador, this new series of research-based works is concerned with notions of digital heritage, the rupturing of historical context, and the rendering of poetry within new ideas of narrativity.

TSPCollage01

John Greer: retroActive

John Greer: retroActive

John Greer: retroActive is a project celebrating over four decades of inspiring and enlightening production from one of Nova Scotia most important artists.  This exhibition offers insight into Greer’s artmaking from the late-1960s to the present day, featuring works from the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia’s Permanent Collection, key loans from outside sources, and new pieces created by the artist to be displayed publicly for the first time.  The artist’s profound influence and diverse production are thoroughly explored in John Greer: retroActive and within a fully-illustrated, hardcover book that accompanies this presentation at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

Res Ipsa Loquitur!

Perchoirs

Perchoirs

Highlighting major works from the collection of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, this exhibition draws from the series The Blind Spot by Lyne Lapointe, created from 1996 to 2002. Born in Montreal in 1957, Lapointe’s career dates back to the 1980s, when she quickly made a name for herself as one of the most remarkable artists of her generation. Her use of uncommon, carefully chosen images and motifs draw from the artist’s longstanding interest in popular and historical sources, and her fascination with animal imagery and geometric figures. The notion of metamorphosis then seems to emerge as a fundamental element of meaning, exploring the complexity of knowledge. As part of the Momentum Series,circulating works from the Collection of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal

 

Mining Legacies

Mining Legacies

Opening Reception: 6-8 pm, Friday June 26, 2015. Everyone is welcome. Artists Blundell and Ward will be in attendance

Resulting from the collaborative workshop hosted by the CBU Art Gallery in partnership with the Cape Breton Miner’s Museum, Mining Legacies will present the work of artists Victoria Ward and Gary Blundell alongside a group community exhibition on the subject of mining history in industrial Cape Breton.

As a counterpoint to Mining Legacies, Heather Sparling’s Canary in the Mine exhibit explores how songs document a history of mining disasters, their ability to tell how disasters affect families and communities, the impact of the news media and music industry on disaster songs and the significance of benefit and anniversary concerts.

 

More Exhibition Listings »

Latest articles
Winter survival guide

Winter survival guide

Winter is often described as a period of contemplation, but I admit that my thoughts mostly gravitate to murdering snow with my hairdryer. Thank goodness there are some exciting things to read and see in the art world that distract my frustration (and electrical bill). You see, I have a term for some people in...
From the archives: Susan Wood's Earth Skins

From the archives: Susan Wood’s Earth Skins

Editor’s note: This review of Earth Skins at Mount Saint Vincent University Art Gallery (Halifax, NS, August 23 – October 2, 2011) first appeared in the Spring 2012 issue of Visual Arts News. A retrospective publication of Earth Skins can be purchased here. I was the first visitor to wander into to Earth Skins: Three...
From the archives: Cut/Fold/Play

From the archives: Cut/Fold/Play

Editor’s note: Paper Doll first appeared in the Spring 2012 issue of Visual Arts News.  Mention paper dolls to nearly any North American woman and the response is a soft “Oh, I loved my paper dolls.” While huge numbers of little girls spend hours happily re-inventing themselves through playing with their dolls, in later life,...
From the archives: In bed with Carl Stewart

From the archives: In bed with Carl Stewart

Editor’s note: Laura Kenin’s profile of Carl Stewart appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of Visual Arts News.   For many Haligonians living in a city full of students and other transient young people at a time of widespread bedbug fear, the sight of used mattresses may arouse disgust or serve as a reminder it’s end-of-the-school-year time again....
From the archives: Mathieu Léger transforms cultural detritus

From the archives: Mathieu Léger transforms cultural detritus

Editor’s Note: This review originally ran in the Fall 2014 issue of Visual Arts News. In Acadian author France Daigle’s 2012 novel Pour sûr, Antoinette opens a game of Scrabble against her husband, The Cripple, with a controversial 125 points. Her word, dialyse, she argued, to her husband’s chagrin, contained two vertical words—“y” and “a.” “It wasn’t the 21...
From the Archives: Shary Boyle's voice in the dark

From the Archives: Shary Boyle’s voice in the dark

“When creating Music for Silence I was inspired by the idea of the Universal, the power and insignificance of the individual, and how that relates to the idea of ‘voice." —Shary Boyle
Art News Roundup

Art News Roundup

From new pop-up galleries to gallery acquisitions, Visual Arts News brings you the latest Atlantic Canadian and National art news headlines. NOVA SCOTIA: HALIFAX: NSCAD University’s Anna Leonowen’s opens the new exhibition Alternative Means: An Aesthetic Field Guide to Kejimkujik National Park at the Gallery from November 11 to 15. HALIFAX: The Outlier Film Festival lineup has...
A walk through Charlottetown's Art in the Open 2014

A walk through Charlottetown’s Art in the Open 2014

The Scotiabank Nuit Blanche spectacle in Toronto with its more than 110 contemporary art projects gets most of the press, of course, but Charlottetown’s fourth annual Art in the Open—with more than 36 projects in six locations throughout PEI’s capital city—was an evening’s entertainment worth the travel. In 2013 I made the error of having...
Constructing home: Pam Hall's "Housework(s)"

Constructing home: Pam Hall’s “Housework(s)”

A house, whether it is built of bricks, stones, clay or paper, is always more than the materials that make it. In her recent exhibition Housework(s) (at The Rooms gallery in St. John’s.), Pam Hall explores the essence of the house and the core qualities that support its physical structure. Hall’s social engagement with the...
Q & A: Visual Arts News Featured Fall artist

Q & A: Visual Arts News Featured Fall artist

A maker of stories and collector curious things, Jerry Ropson strings together tiny histories that explore the ties between people, place and identity. We feature Ropson's work in our fall issue of the magazine.
Framing nature

Framing nature

Like snapshots of ephemeral performances and land art pieces, or installation shots which end up being re-presented in their own installative environments, Greenshaw captures in her work exemplary paradoxes.
The marks left behind

The marks left behind

For more than 20 years, Denise Hawrysio has continuously pushed the boundaries of printmaking, shifting traditional printmaking techniques into the realm of contemporary art while reflecting modern realities. Hawrysio removes the walls between her studio and the outside world by taking her etching plates into everyday public spaces, where she finds unique and unexpected ways...