The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2017

REBUILD

EMILY PITTMAN

BRENDAN FERNANDES

RAVEN DAVIS

Beyond a seat at the table

Beyond a seat at the table

Black contemporary artists constantly have to explain themselves to be accepted into the dominant framework. Their work is often defined as activism, without their consent, merely because it is presented from their own worldview.
Brendan Fernandes' hybrid ghosts

Brendan Fernandes’ hybrid ghosts

"For me growing up in East Africa and living in the Western world, when I first came, there was always this idea that I was exotic."
Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane's controversial legacy

Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane’s controversial legacy

Visual Arts News' research intern explores the legacy of two NFB films from the '70s—One film portrayed Indigenous people in visual art, while the other depicted Indigenous people as visual art.
Steele + Tomczak collect strangers' confessions

Steele + Tomczak collect strangers’ confessions

The works in The Long Time transmit the sense that you’re missing or meeting something, getting just a trace of what came before and what is coming next.
Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Artists Kyle Alden Martens and Emily Lawrence both create playful work that subtly destabilizes traditionally heteronormative arenas—sports for Martens and mainstream porn and Martha Stewart cooking demonstrations for Lawrence.
The myth of home

The myth of home

Jerry Ropson’s to kiss a goat between the horns is a memorial to a cultural vernacular and way of life that has already left us—his grandfather's rural Newfoundland culture.
Exhibition Listings
From 2D to 3D: Mapping Halifax Over Time

From 2D to 3D: Mapping Halifax Over Time

The GISciences Centre has undertaken a project to create a digital platform that explores the geographic history of Halifax by recreating historic images in 2D and 3D. The images allow people to view streets, buildings, and other topographic features and the changes that have occurred in Halifax over time. While future additions of data and imagery will include early colonial maps of Halifax from the time of its founding in 1749, this exhibition presents depictions of Halifax from just before the Explosion to the present day.

Negotiations

Negotiations

The Hydrostone neighbourhood, now nearly one hundred years old, is one of the most striking legacies of the Halifax Explosion. It stands as a powerful testament to the reconstruction efforts required to house the working-class families who were left homeless by the events of the Explosion. For many, however, the Hydrostone’s appeal lies in its unique ability to express the passage of time: in this neighbourhood, layers of the present co-exist with traces of the past. The original grey granite ‘hydrostone’ blocks live anachronistically side-by-side with a dizzying array of wood, composite, and vinyl siding materials. Extensions have been added, shutters have been removed, exterior walls have been painted, porches have been closed in, and trees, shrubs, and gardens have been cultivated.

Halifax artist Claire Hodge has systematically photographed all of the existing homes to create a portrait of the changing face of a landmark neighbourhood. Hodge notes, “The Hydrostone townhomes reveal a complex set of negotiations realized tacitly or explicitly by the people who have lived there. Some blocks of houses are united in their aesthetic vision. Others seem to attest to greater individualist streaks and look strangely disjointed. Most often, the blocks of houses suggest a series of compromises between harmony and difference, between the ‘greater good’ and tenacious individualism.”

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Circulated by the Foreman Art Gallery Curated by Carl Johnson

This touring exhibition brings together 15 years of works by Brazilian-Canadian artist Giorgia Volpe, whose multidisciplinary practice often fosters relationships and dialogue —whether through fleeting interventions, public performances, or art objects. In particular, Volpe draws from remnants that end up in recycling centres or landfill sites, working with readily available materials and discards. Volpe often relies on weaving to develop her works, blending found materials as a metaphor for complex human relations, and inviting us to look differently at what already exists.

Girogia Volpe, La grande maille – Labyrinthe (detail),  mixed media, 2015

 

Ropeworks

Ropeworks

Mixed media artist Violet Rosengarten‘s vibrant exhibition, Ropeworks, is composed of painted surfaces and painted rope on wood or canvas. These colourful textured reliefs play with the natural way that rope meanders, entangles and coils. Her colour choices refer to sea voyages to other cultures, the warming of the ocean, the colours of shells, corals, and seaweed, the fluorescence of buoys and other aspects of maritime culture.

The Salon Hanging

The Salon Hanging

A floor to ceiling feast for the eyes. Visitors will see over 100 works of art, many from the Owens original collection first acquired in the 1880s. The collection includes eighteenth and nineteenth century European paintings, many still found in their original gilded frames, and full-scale plaster copies of classical Greek sculptures. Originally this collection was used to teach Mount Allison Fine Arts students through copying these early pieces. The exhibition is designed and installed by the Owens’ preparator Roxie Ibbitson.

RE:collection

RE:collection

 RE:collection explores the building of a Canadian art collection in Charlottetown as both an optimistic mission and a reflection on the evolving country, its history, geography, people and communities. The diverse visions, observations, and ideas of artists represented within the collection allow us to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation with one of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s largest collections-based exhibitions and publication.

Robert Harris (1849-1919), The Studio Boy’s Private View, 1886, oil on canvas, 89.5 x 74.5 cm. Gift of an anonymous donor, 1978, CAG H-571

Kathleen Daly (1898-1994), Untitled (Young Man & Landscape), undated, oil on canvas, 96.5 x 83.8 cm.Gift of the Estate of Kathleen Daly, Toronto, Ont., 1994, CAG 94.5.60

Garry Neill Kennedy (1935-), Q (from Quid Pro Quo), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 274.3 x 213.4 cm. Gift of the artist, 2016, CAG 2016.3

Go Figure

Go Figure

In contrast to abstract art, figurative art is a diverse category for artworks that represent recognizable objects in the world. It ranges from realism to nearly abstract. The artists included in this exhibition explore human and animal figures. Through figurative narratives, the painters Brian Burke and Michael Harrington consider basic questions of the human condition and comment on contemporary society. Marcus Jones’ aluminum and bronze sculptures of human and animal sculls employ the lost wax process. They are rooted in representation but also explore abstraction, fragility and decay.

Brian Burke, Untitled, oil on canvas,2016.

 

Marcus Jones, Trophy, cast aluminum, 2017.

 

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

THE PORTER COLLECTION
With a specific mandate to collect artworks by local and regional artists, and an emphasis on collecting works on paper, the Dalhousie Art Gallery permanent collection includes a number of mid and later twentieth century paintings and drawings of maritime subject matter. Because many of these have been acquired through donation, not only do they reflect the Gallery’s collecting interests, they also represent and reflect the various collecting interests of the donors.

The most recent donation to the Gallery is a selection of thirteen works from the private collection of Brian and Megan Porter and Family. Through their shared passion for art and a love for Atlantic Canada, the Porters have built a collection of early twentieth century paintings of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia maritime scenes, and works by several contemporary Atlantic Canadian artists.

Their donation makes a significant contribution to strengthening our collection, both by introducing the work of Molly Lamb and Mary Pratt—artists who were not as yet represented in the collection—and in complementing works by artists who are touchstones in the collection and in the Gallery’s collecting history, including AY Jackson, Robert Pilot, and Christopher Pratt.

Walking the Debris Field: Public Geographies of the Halifax Explosion

Walking the Debris Field: Public Geographies of the Halifax Explosion

The Halifax Explosion reverberates as a definitive historic moment around which themes of destruction, reconstruction, urbanism, and community continue to circulate. From 2014 through 2017, as the centenary of the Explosion approaches, Narratives in Space + Time Society (NiS+TS) has presented a number of public walking events designed to explore the ways in which the disaster, the ensuing relief efforts, and the reconstruction continue to shape the diverse experiences and understandings of this city.

Founded in 2012 and based in Halifax and Dartmouth, NiS+TS is an interdisciplinary creative research group that promotes walking and the use of mobile media by artists and members of the public. The group’s projects are situated in spaces that are often overlooked, disused, or vacant. Participants use walking, talking, and making objects in combination with technologies such as GPS, smartphones, and mobility tracking devices to conduct interactive explorations of locations and subjects.

Utilizing research methods such as psychogeography, an experiential approach to drifting through urban space devised by the French theorist Guy Debord, and creation models that emphasize interdisciplinary collaborations, the exhibition features new projects created by NiS+TS to mark the Halifax Explosion’s 100th commemoration.

Claire Hodge: Negotiations
Curated by Peter Dykhuis

The Hydrostone neighbourhood, now nearly one hundred years old, is one of the most striking legacies of the Halifax Explosion. It stands as a powerful testament to the reconstruction efforts required to house the working-class families who were left homeless by the events of the Explosion. For many, however, the Hydrostone’s appeal lies in its unique ability to express the passage of time: in this neighbourhood, layers of the present co-exist with traces of the past. The original grey granite ‘hydrostone’ blocks live anachronistically side-by-side with a dizzying array of wood, composite, and vinyl siding materials. Extensions have been added, shutters have been removed, exterior walls have been painted, porches have been closed in, and trees, shrubs, and gardens have been cultivated.

Halifax artist Claire Hodge has systematically photographed all of the existing homes to create a portrait of the changing face of a landmark neighbourhood. Hodge notes, “The Hydrostone townhomes reveal a complex set of negotiations realized tacitly or explicitly by the people who have lived there. Some blocks of houses are united in their aesthetic vision. Others seem to attest to greater individualist streaks and look strangely disjointed. Most often, the blocks of houses suggest a series of compromises between harmony and difference, between the ‘greater good’ and tenacious individualism.”

Holding Patterns

Holding Patterns

Main gallery

Textile artist Rachel Ryan investigates the various meanings suggested by her title, whether it is pattern in the textile sense or breaking free of the “holding pattern” of military wife and daughter.  In this mini-retrospective, the artist takes us through six years of her nature-based imagery with a mosaic quality.  Mainly autobiographical in theme, she explores the role of being a female artist and mother in our contemporary world.  Ryan’s most recent works evoke the evolving awareness of women.

Ryan Rachel – Fire And Water –Fabric Collage -2012

Gallery 3
Artist Talk: Fri 29 September, 4:30PM
Doucette’s exhibition presents a new version of history, shedding light on our colonial past, reframing key figures and exposing false ideas. He offers, “My work stems from the hypothesis that historyis a lie that no one ever questions. Often artists were obligated to convey an official message, sometimes largely tainted by political motivations, thus evoking an incomplete version of the facts. This is certainly the case of the artists who represented the history of the Acadians in Canada. It is a history that is often a one-sided perspective from a Colonial British viewpoint which presented the Acadian population in terms of a problem that needed to be solved.”

Bio: Mario Doucette is an Acadian artist from Moncton, NB. He is a painter, but also works with video, digital animation, performance and Super8 film. He has been featured in many exhibitions in several Canadian museums and galleries, notably at Toronto’s ROM where he was a Sobey Art Award finalist in 2008. Generously supported by Canada Council for the Arts and Arts NS.

Shane Song

Shane Song

Opening: Wednesday Sept 6,  6 – 8pm

More Exhibition Listings »

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