The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: FALL 2017

REBUILD

EMILY PITTMAN

BRENDAN FERNANDES

RAVEN DAVIS

Beyond a seat at the table

Beyond a seat at the table

Black contemporary artists constantly have to explain themselves to be accepted into the dominant framework. Their work is often defined as activism, without their consent, merely because it is presented from their own worldview.
Brendan Fernandes' hybrid ghosts

Brendan Fernandes’ hybrid ghosts

"For me growing up in East Africa and living in the Western world, when I first came, there was always this idea that I was exotic."
Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane's controversial legacy

Indigenous artists challenge Paul Kane’s controversial legacy

Visual Arts News' research intern explores the legacy of two NFB films from the '70s—One film portrayed Indigenous people in visual art, while the other depicted Indigenous people as visual art.
Steele + Tomczak collect strangers' confessions

Steele + Tomczak collect strangers’ confessions

The works in The Long Time transmit the sense that you’re missing or meeting something, getting just a trace of what came before and what is coming next.
Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Emily Lawrence in conversation with Kyle Alden Martens

Artists Kyle Alden Martens and Emily Lawrence both create playful work that subtly destabilizes traditionally heteronormative arenas—sports for Martens and mainstream porn and Martha Stewart cooking demonstrations for Lawrence.
The myth of home

The myth of home

Jerry Ropson’s to kiss a goat between the horns is a memorial to a cultural vernacular and way of life that has already left us—his grandfather's rural Newfoundland culture.
Exhibition Listings
The Salon Hanging

The Salon Hanging

A floor to ceiling feast for the eyes. Visitors will see over 100 works of art, many from the Owens original collection first acquired in the 1880s. The collection includes eighteenth and nineteenth century European paintings, many still found in their original gilded frames, and full-scale plaster copies of classical Greek sculptures. Originally this collection was used to teach Mount Allison Fine Arts students through copying these early pieces. The exhibition is designed and installed by the Owens’ preparator Roxie Ibbitson.

Patti & Lawrence

Patti & Lawrence

Patti & Lawrence is a video projection by Paul Wong that uses found images and personal film footage to construct narratives on growing up Queer and Asian. It is presented in partnership with the Prismatic Arts Festival, Canada’s only multi-arts festival featuring culturally diverse and Aboriginal artists.

Paul Wong, Patti 21&25, Video, 2016

 

 

RE:collection

RE:collection

 RE:collection explores the building of a Canadian art collection in Charlottetown as both an optimistic mission and a reflection on the evolving country, its history, geography, people and communities. The diverse visions, observations, and ideas of artists represented within the collection allow us to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation with one of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s largest collections-based exhibitions and publication.

Robert Harris (1849-1919), The Studio Boy’s Private View, 1886, oil on canvas, 89.5 x 74.5 cm. Gift of an anonymous donor, 1978, CAG H-571

Kathleen Daly (1898-1994), Untitled (Young Man & Landscape), undated, oil on canvas, 96.5 x 83.8 cm.Gift of the Estate of Kathleen Daly, Toronto, Ont., 1994, CAG 94.5.60

Garry Neill Kennedy (1935-), Q (from Quid Pro Quo), 2012, acrylic on canvas, 274.3 x 213.4 cm. Gift of the artist, 2016, CAG 2016.3

Eight Drawings for Invisible Cities

Eight Drawings for Invisible Cities

​Opening 6pm Thursday 23rd November.
This set of drawings are based on the orchestral score of Solea di Diomira by Dinuk Wijeratne. The drawings themselves are strongly influenced by Cy Twombly’s work titled Poems to the Sea. Within the drawings are visual references to Joan Mitchel’s abstract aesthetics. And finally, the original music by Dinuk Wijeratne is an homage to Italo Calvino’s book titled Invisible Cities.

The gist of these drawings are to remind viewers that new art is often influenced by the art of other artists. My take on this paradigm is to adopt the idea directly and fully give credit to the artists who inspired and influenced this work. The only novelty may be the notion of using music for the compositional structure, I should add that it is not the sounds of the recorded music that is used but the actual score which is used as the visual motif.

Lastly, the final passage of text of Calvino’s Invisible Cities is a plea to respect and facilitate those who make our present day existence more tolerable. These drawings may serve as  an enticement for more people to read his book and discover the passage for themselves”  –  Patrick Rapati

New Paintings & "Slow Century"

New Paintings & “Slow Century”

Kim and Andy are both exploring the idea of nostalgia and shared memories, through popular objects in popular culture or recent history.

Andy MacDonald, Slow Century, Acrylic on Board, 2017

Kim Floyd, Parking Ramp, Kim Floyd , Acrylic on Board, 2017

 

 

 

Forged

Forged

Photographer Steve Wadden documents the steel-working neighbourhood of Whitney Pier, Cape Breton. Shot over a ten-year period, the photographs document an era of sharp economic downturn in the region, following the closure of Sydney’s steel plant on its 100th anniversary in 2001. Forged records the city’s devastation and re-construction in the years following economic collapse and documents the community’s cultural responses to the city’s changing circumstances, while preserving the memories of steel-working’s heyday.

Steve Wadden, Untitled, 2005

 

 

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

From the Vault: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

THE PORTER COLLECTION
With a specific mandate to collect artworks by local and regional artists, and an emphasis on collecting works on paper, the Dalhousie Art Gallery permanent collection includes a number of mid and later twentieth century paintings and drawings of maritime subject matter. Because many of these have been acquired through donation, not only do they reflect the Gallery’s collecting interests, they also represent and reflect the various collecting interests of the donors.

The most recent donation to the Gallery is a selection of thirteen works from the private collection of Brian and Megan Porter and Family. Through their shared passion for art and a love for Atlantic Canada, the Porters have built a collection of early twentieth century paintings of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia maritime scenes, and works by several contemporary Atlantic Canadian artists.

Their donation makes a significant contribution to strengthening our collection, both by introducing the work of Molly Lamb and Mary Pratt—artists who were not as yet represented in the collection—and in complementing works by artists who are touchstones in the collection and in the Gallery’s collecting history, including AY Jackson, Robert Pilot, and Christopher Pratt.

The Colville Gallery

The Colville Gallery

A permanent exhibition space devoted to the work of Alex Colville (1920-2013), one of Canada’s most celebrated artists and one of Mount Allison University’s best known graduates. The Gallery features the installation of the mural Athletes, commissioned by Mount Allison for its new Athletic Centre in 1961. Designed around the theme of the student athlete, the mural was the focal point of the new building; it remained there for over 50 years, until its present installation in the stable and secure environment of Owens Art Gallery. Other artworks by Colville are also on view, including many of the preparatory drawings for Athletes and examples of the artist’s serigraphs.

Alex Colville, Athletes, oil and synthetic resin on board, 1961.

Main Lands and Long Winters

Main Lands and Long Winters

After moving to Bonavista, artist Jane Walker joined a group of women who got together once a week at the Legion to work on textile projects, chat, and have tea and snacks. She spent much of the winter  — matting season — working on a series of steel wool rug works, both at home and at the Legion. With this new body of work, Walker poetically responds to the history of craft in this province, while exploring a key narrative of its history: imagining “elsewhere” as a place for a better life, and realizing that what is most supportive and beneficial is often nearby.

Jane Walker, Looking East, Steel wool, metal mesh, pine, salt water (Troon), 2017. photo credit: The Rooms

 

A Going Concern: Contemporary Textiles and Everyday Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador

A Going Concern: Contemporary Textiles and Everyday Politics in Newfoundland and Labrador

The artists in this exhibition represent a vibrant, ongoing conversation in this province. They draw upon Newfoundland and Labrador’s rich textile traditions to provide deceptively playful commentary on serious subject matter. In various ways, they focus attention on what is often outside official histories, asking pointed questions about politics, labour, value, and the definitions of art itself.

Malin Enstrom, Speed Bump, Wool on burlap, 2017. photo credit: Courtesy of the artist

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Weaving the Existing: Works by Giorgia Volpe

Circulated by the Foreman Art Gallery Curated by Carl Johnson

This touring exhibition brings together 15 years of works by Brazilian-Canadian artist Giorgia Volpe, whose multidisciplinary practice often fosters relationships and dialogue —whether through fleeting interventions, public performances, or art objects. In particular, Volpe draws from remnants that end up in recycling centres or landfill sites, working with readily available materials and discards. Volpe often relies on weaving to develop her works, blending found materials as a metaphor for complex human relations, and inviting us to look differently at what already exists.

Girogia Volpe, La grande maille – Labyrinthe (detail),  mixed media, 2015

 

When One Space Meets Another

When One Space Meets Another

 

A new installation by Sackville artist Leah Garnett which draws upon her childhood experiences growing up around construction sites and the woods of rural Maine.

When One Space Meets Another is curated by Pan Wendt, and co-organized by the Confederation Centre Art Gallery and the Owens Art Gallery.

 

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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