The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: SUMMER 2016

RILLA MARSHALL

JESSE JACOBS

RAY FENWICK

TONIA DI RISIO

Tracing the gestures: Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard find everyday wonder on the Magdalen Islands

Tracing the gestures: Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard find everyday wonder on the Magdalen Islands

Marie-Line Leblanc and Sara Dignard were to deny the Google Maps or other formal ways of mapping the area and seek the unwritten in the unexpected.
Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

Towards a theory of grant aesthetics

In an art world unbeholden to market forces, what’s the correlation between the jurors of funding councils and awards to who they render visible and the image of Canadian that presents to the rest of the world?
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
Listening to the Land

Listening to the Land

Jane Reagh (BFA, NSCAD ’86; MFA, Parson’s School of Design ’89) refers to herself as a “RE-emerging artist” to describe women who took time off from their profession to focus on raising their children. When they “RE-emerge” they have the fresh eyes of a new painter as well as many years of painting behind them. Reagh now lives in Corner Brook, Newfoundland where she paints landscape “en plein air”. Her approach is to record the time of her engagement with the land, unmediated by technology. “Every time I make a painting I get closer to what is really there.” Listening to the Land features Canadian oil paintings, with a focus on Western Newfoundland.

 

About Three Years Ago

About Three Years Ago

The Side Gallery features fellow NSCAD alumnus Daniel Hutchinson, now based in Hamilton. His painting practice explores what makes a painting count as a “painting,” while emphasizing the primacy of perceptual experience. This solo exhibition presents new work along with a selection of paintings from the past few years, showing the development of his ideas and methods. Many appear at first entirely black, yet are replete with glistening light, formed by reflections captured through striated brushstrokes. The moving spectator perceives new conditions at every spatial location.

It’s Not What You Think

It’s Not What You Think

Opening Reception: Friday, 1 April, 8pm

Halifax-based abstract painter Leya Evelyn shows a series of new works evoking uncensored memories and feelings. Building layers of paint over a base of personal images, Evelyn responds to the emotions they fuel, seeking to capture the complexity of life and transforming the image into a visceral experience. The painting’s layers and depth become a metaphor for the elusiveness of knowledge and experience.

Image: “Subject to One, no. 3”, Leya Evelyn, oil on canvas, 42″ x 42″, 2015. Photo: Steve Farmer

Silhouettes and Other Shadows

Silhouettes and Other Shadows

This exhibition presents a selection of works from the Owens’ collection which features silhouettes, shadows and prominent contour lines. Cut paper silhouettes were originally used as an affordable method to capture a person’s likeness in the eighteenth century and remain a popular trope in advertising today. The works in this exhibition use silhouettes to go beyond traditional portraiture, incorporating a variety of media including but not limited to painted china, silkscreen and film.

Susan Schelle, Calendar, porcelain plates, gold leaf, silkscreen, 1994. Photo credit: Owens Art Gallery

Rachel Beach

Rachel Beach

NSCAD grad Rachel Beach returns to Halifax from New York, bringing her painted sculptures—or sculptural paintings—to the main space at Saint Marys’ University Art Gallery. Beach’s freestanding painted wooden sculptures, made up of balanced geometric forms, play with form and volume, positive and negative space, mass and void. A series of platforms on the floor each present a sculpture or a group of sculptures, while wall pieces mirror this strategy, with one large piece, or several smaller ones, grouped within an allotted square.

 

Holding the Pose: Portraits from the Collection

Holding the Pose: Portraits from the Collection

 

 

Disoriented

Disoriented

Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery marks the fifth anniversary of the Arab Spring with a special exhibition of recent acquisitions for the Permanent Collection. In his ground-breaking critical examination of Orientalism, Palestinian literary scholar Edward Said deconstructed the romanticizing, exoticising, colonial discourse that has shaped Western perceptions of the diverse societies of the Middle East and Asia. Disoriented presents works that implicitly challenge Orientalism – by articulating more complex, problematic or unresolved accounts of, or giving voice to, the contemporary experience of artists of Asian descent.

Glimpses of Eden

Glimpses of Eden

William Allderdice began painting when he retired as a professor of geography, studying under artists such as Gerald Squires, Tara Bryan, and Kathleen Knowling. Over the past two decades, he has created a prolific body of paintings and drawings that document memories from throughout his life, ranging from his early adventures (and mishaps) as a cowboy to his current life in The Battery neighbourhood of St. John’s.

Packing Salt Fish: they too stand to face the sea,

Packing Salt Fish: they too stand to face the sea,

These large scale works are ripe with comment, veneration and pay a great homage to a population of Nova Scotian women who continue to carry an industry.

“The paintings are a series of expressive figurative works that combine iconography, metaphor and text; all layered in a way that allows me to both explore the historical degradation of the fishery and venerate and monumentalize the women fish packers who work in small sheds throughout Nova Scotia.

The paintings draw upon different sources, including religious iconography, classical symbolism, folk traditions and motifs, as well as my own documentation of women at their place of work.”

Tantramar again, again: An exhibition celebrating twenty years of the Tantramar Heritage Trust

Tantramar again, again: An exhibition celebrating twenty years of the Tantramar Heritage Trust

This year the Tantramar Heritage Trust, Sackville, NB, celebrates its 20th anniversary. The Owens Art Gallery and Mount Allison University are honoured and pleased to participate in this celebration with the presentation of an exhibition on the theme of the Tantramar Marsh, including works by Thaddeus Holownia, Edward Pulford, Ethel Ogden, Garry Neill Kennedy and others. The exhibition is accompanied by a slide show of contemporary and historical photographs provided by members of the Trust.

Margaret Chipman, Tantramar Marsh, oil on board,c.1960.  Purchased with funds from the Blanche Beatrice Peppard Endowment Fund

Holding the Pose: Portraits from the Collection

Holding the Pose: Portraits from the Collection

This exhibition features portraits from the collection that capture a dialogue between artist and subject.

Cutline: David Blackwood, Captain Jesse Winsor Home in Wesleyville, (detail), 1975, etching and aquatint on paper, 87 x 58 cm. Collection of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery.

Remotes

Remotes

 Opening Reception: Thursday, April 7, 2016, 6 – 8pm
Artist Talk: Sunday, April 10, 2pm

Each print in his series, Remotes, is the result of strategic hi-res scanning of an electronic TV or DVD remote controller, small sections of which have been cropped in squares, significantly enlarged and printed. The Remotes series plays upon effects resulting from shifts in scale. Through magnification, the viewer is alienated or detached from the device’s initial purpose and left to negotiate a micro-world of large coloured blobs, unfamiliar surfaces, decontextualized scraps of text, and various detritus (dust, human hairs, glue, etc.).

Janzen was born in Winnipeg and is located in Montreal. Janzen works in digital imaging, photography, video, installation, artist books, and other media. He has exhibited and worked as an artist-in-residence at diverse locations across Canada.

More Exhibition Listings »

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