The cover of the current issue

Current Issue: Spring 2016

LEAH MODIGLIANI

PAUL ÉDOUARD BOURQUE

THIERRY DELVA

COCO GUZMAN

 

Liberated Form

Liberated Form

Richard Mueller is not so interested in coherent pictorial space or literal depiction as in the potential of formal arrangements to engender associative and emotional responses “independent of literal language.”
Echoes across time and space

Echoes across time and space

L’Acadie Mythique, a travelling exhibition that recently visited the Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery, is curated by Harlan Johnson and features nearly twenty different artists from across the Acadian diaspora.
Q + A: Jordan Bennett

Q + A: Jordan Bennett

Visual Arts News was excited to feature the work of artist Jordan Bennett in our Fall 2015 issue. In this online installation of her interview series, Current Conditions & Forecasts, Eryn Foster chats with Bennett about everything ranging from his...
The strange new world of Bridget Moser

The strange new world of Bridget Moser

In this installation of the Visual Arts News Podcast, our new host David Dahms picks artist Bridget Moser's brain about her latest show at MSVU Art Gallery in Halifax, Bridget Moser: Is This Thing On.
Found in the Fog

Found in the Fog

  As we walked downtown, my friend described how two old hags had chewed on either side of her neck the night before. It wasn’t the first time. “I’ve learned that the trick,” she told me, “is that...
Art World Antidote

Art World Antidote

Folklore And Other Panics addresses the impossibility of “alleviating anxiety around elitism” in the contemporary art world. And further, according to the exhibition’s pamphlet, “the works provide a constellation of ideas, responding in various ways to themes of...
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
Exhibition Listings
The Many Faces of a Bowl- Wrapped up in Mythic Creatures

The Many Faces of a Bowl- Wrapped up in Mythic Creatures

OPENING RECEPTION – SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2 – 4 pm                     

In the adjacent Annex Gallery, Vicky Northey presents The Many Faces of a Bowl- Wrapped up in Mythic Creatures. Inspired by the historical examples she found in a Staffordshire museum, potter Vicky Northey has created a series of complex ceramics adorned with mythic creatures of her home province. Her handbuilt vases and bowls have as many as seven sides and depict giant squid, the sea monsters of Bonavista Bay, the Old Hag and forest fairies.

“In this show I am producing a modern, updated look of the decorative ceramics of Britain of the 1800’s when Darwin returned home with exotic specimens from around the globe.  Loose figurative sculptures are married with strong open geometric forms.  These complex bowl and vase forms are an extension of my experiments into slab-based pottery providing challenges in engineering and construction skills. In collecting specimens to create a mythology of Newfoundland, I considered plant and animal creatures that are taylor-made for this geographic area. The loosely sculpted beings are displayed with a humourous eye in contrast to the strict measurements and precision of the bowl or vase. The rigid geometric structure presents the animal as a decorative specimen which appears to crawl across the surface of the bowl.”

Vicky began working with clay first at the Craft Council Clay Studio where she attended classes and workshops. She brings her experience as a music teacher to the craft of ceramics. “We don’t work music, we play music,” she explains. And it is that same essential skill of play that she brings to her decorative stoneware pieces, combining the whimsical with the utilitarian. She handbuilds or extrudes her forms rather than throwing them on a potter’s wheel. She uses paper clay for the sculptural pieces which allows her more time and flexibility to work detail into form as it is holds water longer than traditional clay. Now playing in the mud from her studio at home she continues to explore hand built ceramics.

Dreams

Dreams

McCavour creates through large three-dimensional embroideries an immersive environment which combines dreams and memories of her childhood experience of a visit to Newfoundland.

Amanda McCavour Stand in for home, 2009-2010, thread/machine embroidery, 8 x 8 x 4.5’

Force of Nature

Force of Nature

Ania Biczysko works principally in two media – large steel sculpture and oil paint on plexiglass. The connection between these very different media is her interest in the interpretation of natural phenomena. Ania’s solo and collaborative pieces are in collections in both North America and Europe. She obtained her MFA from the Academy of Fine Arts in Gdansk (Poland). She has exhibited, coordinated and curated many exhibitions over the past 25 years.

IMAGE : Ania Biczysko, Force of Nature ,1 reverse oil painting on plexi, 2015. photo credit: Ania Biczysko

 

 

Enter the Fog

Enter the Fog

The exhibition “Enter the Fog” brings together works by Maya Beaudry, Julia Feyrer, Tamara Henderson and Tiziana La Melia, who embrace personal narrative and intuition as guiding forces in their creative practices. These artists view art as a process rather than as a product; they arrange highly codified and intimate objects to create multi-referential and multi-sensory installations. Using a variety of strategies, they attempt to express the subconscious and reveal the psyche, continually trusting their instincts to transform what might appear as bizarre and fragmented juxtapositions into allegories, screenplays or poems about everyday life. The exhibition will be an immersive and interactive environment, as existing works will be re-interpreted and combined with newly-created, site-specific installations.

Julia Feyrer & Tamara Henderson, Old Hag Bottle, Valerian Tincture, mold blown glass, cork, 2013.  Image courtesy of The Banff Centre. Photo: Rita Taylor, The Banff Centre

 

New Works

New Works

Jimy Sloan is from Sackville, Nova Scotia. He graduated from NSCAD in 2012 with a BFA, Fine Arts Major in painting and completed NSCAD’s New Glasgow residency program. Sloan’s exhibition features work competed with a Nova Scotia Creation grant, exploring figuration. Imagery from photographs, magazines, newspapers, public archives, the internet and other sources is combined and used to create overlaid and interwoven painted images. These paintings become a way to create non-verbal stories, which relate places, events, characters, objects and themes. They are an attempt to create moving images; an idea that is informed by painting, video and aural tradition.

Image:  Jimy Sloan, Subsurface Dynamics, oil on canvas, 2015. photo credit: Jimy Sloan

 

This Little Painting

This Little Painting

This Little Painting” refers to “Red Current Jelly” by Newfoundland artist Mary Pratt, in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. The painting provides the focus for this exhibition exploring Mary Pratt’s process as an artist. Organized by the National Gallery of Canada and The Rooms, and curated by NGC Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Jonathan Shaughnessy, and The Rooms Curator of Contemporary Art, Mireille Eagan.

IMAGE : Mary Pratt, Fish Head in Steel Sink, oil on masonite, 1983. photo credit: National Gallery of Canada

Part of Me

Part of Me

Julia Pickard’s generous spirit and vibrant, impressionist compositions brightened the art scene in St. John’s for 38 years. She was one of a few professionally trained artists in the province when she moved to St. John’s in 1976, and she shared her skills through teaching and mentoring throughout her career. Art was part of her. This Permanent Collection exhibition celebrates Pickard’s life, career and her contributions to the local community.

 

Mi’kwite’tmn (Do you remember?)

Mi’kwite’tmn (Do you remember?)

The exhibition consists of three components all of which explore issues surrounding traditional indigenous cultural heritage which include the relationship between aboriginal language and material culture. The components are: the Museological Grand Hall–a group of empty glass vitrines whose surfaces have been etched with diagrams of the artist’s great grandmother’s baskets; the artist performance; and the Archive Room which contains shelving which shows Johnson’s works from the artist’s O’pltek series, baskets/sculptures that defy traditional format all the while produced using traditional Mi’kmaq techniques.

Ursula Johnson, Upmetukopltek, 2012,  black ash, maple, sweetgrass, 6″ d

18uj2014vitrine

Ursula Johnson, Vitrine, 2014, sand blasted plexi, 14 x 14 x 22′

 

THE LAST ART COLLEGE: NOVA SCOTIA COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN, 1968-1978

THE LAST ART COLLEGE: NOVA SCOTIA COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN, 1968-1978

Joseph Beuys, Sol LeWitt, Gerhard Richter, Dan Graham, Mel Bochner, Lucy Lippard, John Baldessari, Hans Haacke, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Frank, Jenny Holzer, Robert Morris, Eric Fischl, and Dara Birnbaum. Kasper Koenig and Benjamin Buchloh ran the NSCAD Press, publishing books by Hollis Frampton, Lawrence Weiner, Donald Judd, Daniel Buren, Michael Asher, Martha Rosler, and Michael Snow, to highlight some.

Looking to Garry Neill Kennedy’s 2012 published book of the same title as the foundation for this exhibition, The Last Art College: Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1968-1978 provides in-depth examination of how a small art college in Nova Scotia became the epicenter of art education in the 1960s and 1970s. This exhibition will showcase the confluence of artists and ideas brought together during this formative 10 year timeframe.

This exhibition will feature more than 100 objects of various media produced by these and other artists between 1968-1978 as a direct result of their dialogue with NSCAD.

IMAGE: John Baldessari,  I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, lithograph, 1971. photo credit: Courtesy of NSCAD University Permanent Collection

All Around the Circle

All Around the Circle

Whimsical, mixed media creations celebrate the history, culture and music of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Patrick Lundeen’s Greatest Hits

Patrick Lundeen’s Greatest Hits

The exhibition includes large mask paintings, smaller paintings, wall hung installations works,  ‘Chef” sculptures, 3 recent ‘stacked’ sculptures and video.  While Lundeen’s work has a sense of humour it plays with tension— the fine line between funny/scary and happy/sad.

Patrick Lundeen, The Barker, 2012, acrylic/canvas, 73 x 49”

Photo credit: the artist

Colored Mud

Colored Mud

In this new series of paintings, Igor Kolodin explores the “coloured mud” of paint itself. His previous work contained formal compositions of naïve and folkloric images, complicated by coded references to his own life and social trends, Russian iconography, surrealism and mysticism.

In the context of the recent wave of migration from the Middle East to Europe, Kololdin’s new paintings do make one think of his migrant past, from Siberia and Israel to Canada. The paintings conjure shattered surfaces of colour, patterns underfoot or the cracked surface of a desert landscape. Originally from Omsk, in southwestern Siberia, Russia, Kolodin was one of 66,000 Jews who left the former USSR for Israel in 1994. He immigrated again to Halifax in 2009. His work had been exhibited in Israel, Poland, Sweden, reviewed internationally, and acquired for private collections as well as the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

IMAGE: Igor Kolodin, Colored Mud 8, acrylic on canvas, 2015. photo credit: Igor Kolodin

 

More Exhibition Listings »

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