The cover of the current issue

Current Issue:

ANNA TORMA’S IMAGINARY WORLDS

ELEANOR KINGS DARK UTOPIA

THE NEW FACES OF FOLK ART

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: EMERGING CRITICAL WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE

September – December 2015 To further develop critical art writing in this region, Visual Arts News will host a Writer-in-Residence in partnership with the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (AGNS). The residency will be open to emerging critical writers for a 4-month residency/internship and is designed to help develop and promote the work of emerging art critics. The successful applicant will hone writing and editing skills while learning production procedures at Visual Arts News and the AGNS Journal. This introduction to art-magazine publishing and writing is intended to foster new editorial and critical talent. Working closely with the Visual Arts News Editorial committee and mentorship from our Editor and the curators at the AGNS, the writer will receive valuable experience in writing about art, magazine publishing, art criticism and social media management. There will also be opportunities to meet with guest mentors involved in Canadian art publishing who will be...
Physical Landscapes

Physical Landscapes

  While exploring Anatomica, I experienced several moments of disorientation, unsure whether I was approaching a piece with stronger connections to an artists’ studio or a laboratory. Take the human spine curving from a steel frame in the...
Art World Antidote

Art World Antidote

Folklore And Other Panics addresses the impossibility of “alleviating anxiety around elitism” in the contemporary art world. And further, according to the exhibition’s pamphlet, “the works provide a constellation of ideas, responding in various ways to themes of...
From the archives

From the archives

Enter into the imaginary world of Graeme Patterson’s Secret Citadel where memory, invention, and fantasy collide to provoke a multifaceted narrative of childhood friendship, rights of passage and adult isolation.
A measure of disorder: Seripop's exploration of entropy

A measure of disorder: Seripop’s exploration of entropy

Though some mark 50th anniversaries with gold, Séripop’s The Face Stayed East, the Mouth Went West marks the 50th anniversary of Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre by opening with more striking elements. Interested in exploring entropy in bright colours and on...
Exhibition Listings
An Intimate Distance

An Intimate Distance

OPENING RECEPTION Saturday, June 6, 2 to 4pm.

An Intimate Distance presents three compelling multi-component works: Andrea Ward’s Hairstories, Glynis Humphrey’s Gorge and Suzanne Swannie’s Considering Two Small Forms, for Maja and Marta. Apart from illuminating body image issues and other details of women’s lives, these works hold in common a distinctive “aniconism”— the avoidance of figurative depictions of women’s bodies. They exemplify a critical tendency in Second-Wave feminist art-making, the commitment to engage with women’s subjectivity while at the same time refusing to depict women’s bodies as objects of “the gaze”.

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Mining Legacies

Mining Legacies

Opening Reception: 6-8 pm, Friday June 26, 2015. Everyone is welcome. Artists Blundell and Ward will be in attendance

Resulting from the collaborative workshop hosted by the CBU Art Gallery in partnership with the Cape Breton Miner’s Museum, Mining Legacies will present the work of artists Victoria Ward and Gary Blundell alongside a group community exhibition on the subject of mining history in industrial Cape Breton.

As a counterpoint to Mining Legacies, Heather Sparling’s Canary in the Mine exhibit explores how songs document a history of mining disasters, their ability to tell how disasters affect families and communities, the impact of the news media and music industry on disaster songs and the significance of benefit and anniversary concerts.

 

Hyperflat

Hyperflat

In the contemporary art exhibition Hyperflat, Toronto artist Jeannie Thib asks, “What if our contemporary built environments were based on ornamental botanical patterns?” Can “decorative” urban space lead to more caring relationships with our environment and with each other?

Thib uses high-tech design and fabricating techniques to rework decorative floral patterns borrowed from historical textiles and domestic surfaces. In doing so, she generates expansive reliefs and jewel-like models in contemporary industrial materials. Thib envisions botanical pattern – long marginalized as decorative and feminine, as surrounding landscape brought “home” beneath our feet. The artist replaces Modernist rectilinear design with differentiated space and thus restores ideas of the feminine and nature to the heart of world-making.

Circulated by Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery

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A Brief History of Explosions

A Brief History of Explosions

Göllner presents artworks that challenge our abilities to perceive. By gently displacing elements of sound, time and motion, objects are created that defy easy interpretation and bring temporality to the fore. Underlying Göllner’s practice is an experimental methodology; one that utilizes analogue technologies to recall aspects of 20th century history and to ensure the result is inherently physical. Most recently, Göllner has been exploding things.

 

 

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Terroir: a Nova Scotia Retrospective

Borrowing heavily from the language of wine, this 3-part exhibition strategy proposes to look at regional artistic production through the cultural milieu from which it emerges.  Terroir is defined as “the complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.” Terroir is a survey of the AGNS permanent collection with a special focus on Nova Scotia roots — the history and culture of place informing its artistic community’s output. This exhibition tours the province exploring the flavour and makeup of the work collected over the AGNS’ history.

Image credit: Jones Bannerman, Frances M, Still Life with Lobster (detail), c.1883, Oil on canvas, 51.5 x 65.0 cm. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 1933.4

 

Contemporary First Nations Art from the Permanent Collection

Contemporary First Nations Art from the Permanent Collection

This exhibition showcases the changing currents in contemporary First Nations Art across Canada while offering insight into the breadth and diversity of this burgeoning area of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia Permanent Collection.

Image credit: Jane Ash Poitras, Pink Shamans, 1996, Mixed media on canvas, 244.0 x 186.7 cm. Purchased with the support of the Canada Council Acquisition Assistance Program and the Art Sales and Rental Society, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1997, 1997.130

NSCC Photography Exhibition

NSCC Photography Exhibition

22 students of the NSCC Photography Program. The 2015 Grad Show is a diverse collection of images put together by the students of the NSCC Photography program. Each student has studied in various areas of photography including portraiture, product, architecture and commercial. Their work reflects their technical expertise and boundless creativity. The NSCC Photography program has shaped and developed each student by teaching them the technical side of photography to know their camera inside and out, how to harness and utilize light to their advantage, and how to manipulate and perfect images in post production. The photos in the show are representative of the individual artist and their passion for photography.

 

Jewish Artists in Atlantic Canada

Jewish Artists in Atlantic Canada

The Atlantic Jewish Council is proud to present the inaugural exhibition Jewish Artists in Atlantic Canada, a juried show featuring artists from the Maritime provinces.   This survey show runs the gamut in styles and mediums. Works include painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, encaustic and drawing. It’s a captivating and insightful exhibition that provides an intimate and honest look into the inner lives and artistic practices of the represented artist.

Masterworks from the Beaverbrook Art Gallery

Masterworks from the Beaverbrook Art Gallery

This monumental exhibition highlights the first and founding strength of the Beaverbrook Art Gallery – a permanent collection of extraordinary masterworks, the most significant and valuable art collection in Atlantic Canada, and one of the finest and most important holdings of British art in North America. Featuring extraordinary works of art by world-renowned artists, such as Gainsborough, Constable, Copley, Delacroix, Reynolds, Sargent, Sickert, Sisley, Sutherland, Turner, Freud, and Dali, and by seminal artists in the history of Canadian art, such as Krieghoff, Morrice, Harris, and Carr, it represents the remarkable legacy of the multi-millionaire business tycoon, newspaper publisher, politician, author, personal confidant of Sir Winston Churchill, and great philanthropist, Lord Beaverbrook, or Sir William Maxwell (Max) Aitken (1879–1964).

Making its homecoming stop on a North American tour that will continue after its exhibition here to the Judith & Norman Alix Art Gallery in Sarnia, ON, the exhibition will here only further enhanced with additional preparatory works and masterworks from the collection.

Turner
Organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and supported by the Museums Assistance Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, by Presenting Sponsor TD Bank Group, and by the law firm of McInnes Cooper.

Wallace Brannen 1952-2014

Wallace Brannen 1952-2014

This is a tribute to a bright young art student who found himself in the unique position of collaborating with cutting edge conceptual artists at NSCAD in the early seventies. His acquired skills as a Master Printer at the Lithography Workshop ultimately prepared him for the next ten years of his life, teaching and advising local and visiting artists on Baffin Island in the Northwest Territories. The next 30 years of his life crystallized his reputation as an expert art advisor in this region and he continued to be an artist and a mentor, especially after returning to art school in his later years.

 

Mid-Century Modern

Mid-Century Modern

Ranging from portraiture to landscapes painted en plein air, this selection of works made between the 1930s and 1960s captures the character of mid-twentieth century Nova Scotia through impeccable images of its people and places.

Photo credit: Helen Weld, Beach Grass, c 1950, Oil on pulpboard, 60.7 x 68.5 cm

Even Stones Have Life

Even Stones Have Life

Lucy Jarvis, one of Yarmouth area’s best-known artists is the focus of an exhibition that opened at the Yarmouth branch of the Art Gallery Nova Scotia on May 16, until November 8, 2015.

Lucy Jarvis: Even Stones Have Life is an exhibition of her major works from the 1960s and 70s and focuses on work produced by the artist after age 60. To provide a comprehensive look of her life’s work, it is presented in conjunction with Lucy Jarvis: Sketches and Letters and offers visitors a sampling of Jarvis’s sketchbooks, along with letters, photographs and memorabilia. Both have been assembled by curator Roslyn Rosenfeld, and are circulated by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, NB and include many private and institutional loans.

“These two exhibitions together provide an impressive and comprehensive overview of Lucy Jarvis’s life’s work and we are very pleased to feature it in the Yarmouth branch of the Gallery”, said Ray Cronin, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia Director and CEO.

Jarvis, who was born in Toronto, studied in Boston and painted in France, might have been referred to as a ‘true bohemian’ but she was also generous, gregarious, opinionated and unstoppable. None of these traits seemed to come through in her art until later in her life.

In the 1940s and 1950s, Jarvis played a pivotal role in the art community of New Brunswick having co-founded the UNB Art Centre, but many feel her art blossomed after that period when she made four extended trips to Europe mainly to work and study in Paris.

During the decade of her visits to France, the influence of both impressionism and post-impressionism emerged in her work. In the 1970s, small touches of varied colour replaced what earlier would have been more solid areas.

Jarvis spent the last 25 years of her life in the Yarmouth area, living at Pembroke Dyke in a home she shared with longtime friend Helen Weld. Both Jarvis and Weld were well known for their artistic talent sharing a studio and giving art lessons over the years.

Lucy Jarvis died in 1985.

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