Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (Yarmouth)

Harold Edgerton: The Man Who Made Time Stand Still

Harold Edgerton: The Man Who Made Time Stand Still

Harold “Doc” Edgerton (1903-1990) was an American artist and engineer who is well recognized for his pioneering contributions to the development and transformation of the photographic medium through the use of the stroboscope.

Dubbed “the man who made time stand still” in 1987 by National Geographic, Edgerton’s high speed images of moving objects aimed to make visible time itself through a bridging of art and science. Whether the subject matter being a bullet shot through an apple or a pole vaulter taking flight, his iconic and awe-inspiring photographs capture the unseen as well as the popular imagination.

This exhibition is comprised of 30 recently acquired prints by Edgerton that serve as a testament to his innovative and experimental practice.

For more information on Harold Edgerton visit the Edgerton Digital Collections project.

 

Maud Lewis: As Collected by John Risley

Maud Lewis: As Collected by John Risley

John Risley, co-founder of Clearwater Fine Foods has been collecting Maud Lewis’ work on behalf of his company for nearly 20 years. In total, the Collection holds over 200 of Maud’s paintings, including a Paintings For Sale sign which Maud placed in front of her home in Marshalltown, Nova Scotia. Never before shown publicly as a collection, 57 of those paintings will be on display at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in celebration of the work of this legendary folk artist.

 

 

Picture/Perfect

Picture/Perfect

Mark Kasumovic’s photographs and video work revolves around the inherent truth-value of the photograph and the many limitations within the medium. His latest body of work uses the tourist as a backdrop to explore the explosion of digital images as data in the information age.

Kasumovic captures the mediated experience of ‘the tourist’ at various destinations around the world. In this video, Peggy’s Cove (An Ideal Composition), Variant #1, Kasumovic those who populate the site, as opposed to the splendor of the site itself, slowly emerge as the clear focus of his inquiry.

Kasumovic received a MFA from NSCAD University in 2012, and the province’s tourist sites provided rich material for his artistic investigations.

 

Thaddeus Holownia: Sable Island

Thaddeus Holownia: Sable Island

This work explores through the use of 7 × 17 inch color film the unique relationship of basic naturalistic elements on a remote and unique Maritime landscape. A crescent-shaped strip of sand off the southern coast of Nova Scotia, Sable Island was formed by the currents of the Labrador and the Belle Isle curving down from the Arctic and the Gulf Stream upwelling from the tropics. At once the subject of romantic legend and a world that has resolutely resisted domestication, Sable Island is one of the few places on earth where humans have been unable to assert their dominance. The ‘story’ Holownia’s Sable Island photographs gives us is not a symbolic one, but the prototype of a possible relationship with nature on nature’s terms, a pact involving respect and care rather than exploitation and contempt.

Share